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Womens Sailing - Equality

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1. If it was "male only" why was she allowed to enter in the first place?

2. As she was permitted to enter, then it should have been honoured to the end, regardless of what people say?

3. If women are at a disadvantage, then surely that is their choice to enter or not, so long as they dont try pull some handicap thing. 

4. I would say (because men and women are different) that in certain circumstances, there will need to be gender bias, however this should be clearly highlighted (i.e. Mens 100m) if not then it should be open to all, and not have some rule. 

5. in events such as this, what difference does it make to where you finish if competing against men or women, apart from (I guess) losing to a girl. As a competitor, you should be focused on winning, and to win you need to be the best, do these people think that there are some women better than them? 

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I agree Willow, which is why these things need to be clearly defined, i.e. mens 49ers or womens 49ers or 49ers, dont leave it up to some small print, hidden away somewhere, and if you do ensure that whoever is accepting entries knows the small print so when applying to enter, they can reject an application on the grounds of ....

 

do not allow a person to enter with a known breach, and then stop them from racing. 

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Swartie, The limitation of gender was in the Notice of Race, which is precisely where it should be. 

It isn't the responsibility of an organising authority to ensure anyone putting in an entry  is going to comply with restrictions of a notice of race and reject an entry based on that.  This ignores such things as assuming a persons gender based on their name.

It is the responsibility of participants to read the notice of race and ensure that they can comply with it before they enter.

This is very basic, so basic at the level of the World Sailing Cup that I can only conclude that this person was fully cognisant of the restrictions and elected to enter because of a personal agenda.  The odds of entering a world cup without reading a notice of race are for all practical purposes zero.

 

They indirectly admit they knew this in part of their blurble.

 

You should also note that scoring from such an event is often relevant for such things as Olympic qualification so for this event, yes, her participation could directly affect others in an adverse way, it isn't exactly a rum race.

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I have just been told 'female* racing' is only a throw back to the good old days of rampant misogyny and being forced on unsuspecting females by misogynistic yacht clubs. All clubs should refuse to run female only races and if any female complains tell them it is for their own good as it is the 21st century.

 

* the word 'female' was used as according to said gent the words 'girl' and 'ladies' is a misogynistic cling on to the 1950's.

 

I suggested what if the Ladies (living on the edge there with word selection) wanted to sail by themselves and in fact requested a series so they could do just that. Nope, that's not on, they must sail in the general fleet for their own good and that of feminism.

 

I think said gent, a gent who has never asked a female if they or why they wanted their own series, maybe getting ready for gender realignment  :twisted:  :razz:

 

 

 

A slight side note. I didn't know what misogyny meant until a week or so back when Kevin thought he spotted some in a post of mine so I had to go looking. Damn handy that was as it's been use a motherload....female who has given birth load in the last hour or 2.

 

 

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I think it's good to be aware of what constitutes misogyny.

 

Just as it's good to be aware of what constitutes racism.

 

Inadvertent unconscious misogyny (and racism) is alive and well in our and many other societies. Being more aware that some of the phrases we speak habitually every day are derogatory, can only be a good thing. None of us are too old to learn and make ourselves better people.

 

Even things such as the manner in which you refer to your wife when she's not around, can tell others a lot about who you are. Eg. the following sentences:

  1. The Wife won't like that.
  2. My Wife won't like that.
  3. The Missus won't like that.
  4. SWHMBO won't like that.
  5. The Old Lady won't like that.
  6. My Parnter won't like that.
  7. "Real name" won't like that.
  8. Nickname-you'd-use-to-her-face won't like that.

Goes the other way too.

 

The thing is, I think it's important that we learn to tell the difference between a pet name and a derogatory handle. Just as it's important to learn the difference between talking dirty and glorifying sexual assault...

 

Between a compliment and harassment.

 

How does this fit into the current discussion? Sailing is a strongly male dominated area, and many of those in positions of power in this area exhibit the traits I've called out above (including women). Unconscious sexism. We're not always directly or individually to blame for it, it's often part of how we've been brought up, the societal vernacular, and is even deeply rooted in the very language we speak, but we are to blame if we don't learn to recognise it. We are to blame if we are shown it and refuse its existence.

 

Sure, it's not a comfortable feeling to discover that something you've said or done is actually sexist or racist - to be confronted with one's weaknesses or errors - but the bigger man, acknowledges it and learns from it.

 

“A father and son were involved in a car accident and both were taken to hospital. The father died immediately on arrival, but the son survived, so he was taken to the operating theatre for an emergency operation. The surgeon said: “I can’t operate on this boy because he’s my son”. ”...

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“A father and son were involved in a car accident and both were taken to hospital. The father died immediately on arrival, but the son survived, so he was taken to the operating theatre for an emergency operation. The surgeon said: “I can’t operate on this boy because he’s my son”. ”...

 

One father is the sort that rounds around in dresses and has an elevated risk of being a kiddy fiddler.

 

The rest of the post is a bit PC for me sorry Doc. I think it's more for the delicate people whose day isn't complete unless they feel offended about something. How sad it must be to be that selfish and intolerant of your fellow man.

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