Jump to content

YNZ Media release ambiguity?


Recommended Posts

25 minutes ago, aardvarkash10 said:

I'm pretty sure the Road Transport section is not staffed entirely by retired truck drivers either.  Maritime NZ has three core functions  (according to their website) and none of them require anyone at Department level to operate a vessel.  The DO require skills in legislation regulation, coordination, industry consultation etc

The skills required to run a government department are not the skills required to be an operator of a device controlled under the department's function.  Its a laughable argument to suggest that everyone right to the top of any organisation must have career working experience in that field to be credible.

Aarky, you do seem to spend a lot of time defending your fellow bureaucrats.

It is equally laughable, but sadly true, that you are defending people who have little or no knowledge in the fields they are making decisions, and this lack  is reflected in the poor performance of the departments. This is typical of the takeover by professional administrators who just rotate between departments and build ever increasing empires.

I have noticed the department of health is headed by a guy who actually has Dr (as in medical dr) in front of his name, how strange...

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, aardvarkash10 said:

I'm pretty sure the Road Transport section is not staffed entirely by retired truck drivers either.  Maritime NZ has three core functions  (according to their website) and none of them require anyone at Department level to operate a vessel.  The DO require skills in legislation regulation, coordination, industry consultation etc

The skills required to run a government department are not the skills required to be an operator of a device controlled under the department's function.  Its a laughable argument to suggest that everyone right to the top of any organisation must have career working experience in that field to be credible.

What a very odd take on things.

It reminds me of when I was contracting to DoC. When the old bushman, ex cullers etc, were in senior management things got done. They understood the real world implications of their decisions.

I then watched as uni kids slowly took over the management roles and work output became measured in emails sent. No one could go in the bush anymore without someone holding their hand and having to comply with rediculous, impractical H&S bullshit. Practical productivity died. Bloody shame.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yuo both mistake structural or managerial failings as proving a need for deep practical understanding.

I'm not saying MNZ is effective.  I'm just pointing out that no organisation that size is necessarily better from being led by subject matter experts.

Case in point - Air New Zealand: Ralph Norris is acknowledged as one of the most effective CEO's Air New Zealand ever has had.  He came from the banking industry.  The current CEO came from supermarket and big box retail.  Chris Luxon - Unilever.  He sold soap.  Rob Fyfe admittedly used to be an aircraft engineer in the airforce, but he then developed as a leader at Telecom and most lately at BNZ.

For the last 20 years the company has been led by industry outsiders.  It has also, arguably, flourished against stiff competition.

All of those CEOs know how to seek and listen to advice on technical matters.  They act based on facts, not intuition.  

Admittedly, they probably have a clearer mandate and set of objectives than any poor soul trying to run a government depratment.

2 hours ago, Sabre said:

It reminds me of when I was contracting to DoC. When the old bushman, ex cullers etc, were in senior management things got done. They understood the real world implications of their decisions.

Before or after 1995?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Air NZ and Unilever are not lead and staffed by career bureaucrats. 

Promotion from industry avoids that too. Real world experience, frowned upon by current government, has benefits in management but conflicts too much with the dream. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, BOIGuy said:

Air NZ and Unilever are not lead and staffed by career bureaucrats. 

Promotion from industry avoids that too. Real world experience, frowned upon by current government, has benefits in management but conflicts too much with the dream. 

I believe there is a balance point somewhere between inbreeding and mongrelisation.  You need industry knowledge, but you also need an outsider's view.  How you get those two things and then balance them is a trick that eludes many organisations, public and private.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sabre said:

Well after

So, post-Cave Creek when all the ex-bushworkers were managing so well and getting stuff done without that pesky H&S stuff getting in the way...

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, aardvarkash10 said:

So, post-Cave Creek when all the ex-bushworkers were managing so well and getting stuff done without that pesky H&S stuff getting in the way...

Yea I saw the very obvious and lazy way you were going with that but I thought your argument was that people with unrelated experience are capable of getting things done?

I can't comment much else on Cave Creek however as I have never built a viewing platform.

I was involved in a large scale pest control programme that demonstrated that managing pests by trapping over vast areas was not only effective but cheaper than using 1080.

But hey if you think layers of beuracracy of people with no real experience or practical understanding of whats happening on the coal face is the way forward then good for you 👍

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sabre said:

Apologies for the thread drift.. I have given myself a good telling off and will now stay on topic 😁

I went a step further and gave myself a good spanking with the wooden spoon and two hours in the naughty corner.

I'm now up for assault.

Link to post
Share on other sites

the YNZ release resulted in this article being published in Australia

https://www.mysailing.com.au/new-requirements-for-pleasure-craft-departing-overseas/

The opening sentence is a cracker!

I pointed out to the editor of the site that it was inaccurate (both about the number of rescues and the inference of Cat 1 being a "new" requirement) but all he would say was that they took it off the YNZ release.

I have sent an email to the YNZ Comms Mgr with the above link, the response will be interesting...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like someone has added an extra paragraph to the start of that article:

"In the wake of too many boating rescues, skippers leaving New Zealand for overseas ports are now required to obtain a Cat 1 safety certificate, which is sure to provoke mixed reactions among yachties. Have your say."

That sentence does not appear on the press release on these sites:
https://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/public/news/media-releases-2021/20210430a.asp  
https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO2104/S00236/new-requirements-for-pleasure-craft-departing-overseas.htm

So looks like the editor of mysailing is incorrect.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...