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EWOF's - Legal Technical Standards to Meet Compliance (Advice Requested)


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Hello all; I apologize if I am rebuilding a minefield... would anybody be able to point me in the direction of the legal framework and technical standards (the details) that require and enable me to achieve an EWOF, please?

To date; I am seeing NZ Marina Operator Association information quoted. I have found this:

https://www.nzmoa.com/connecting-to-electricity-1

and this;

https://www.marinecert.co.nz/services/marine-ewof/ which is quite informative - but where are the Technical Standards that describe the materiel requirements and standards that achieve Compliance, and then EWOF certification?

Regards, John B

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The legal frame work is the:  Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010

The main standards that apply are:

  • AS/NZS 3000:2007 Part 2; and
  • AS/NZS 3004.2:2014

I might save you a bit of time...

There is no legal way to DIY install a grid connected certifiable system on a boat in New Zealand.  The exemption which applies to electrical work on private residences that you both own and personally live in, does not extend to boats or caravans even if it is your only place of residence.

While you can technically go out and buy all the parts, you need to be a certified electrician to do the physical installation.

It's obviously not impossible to DIY it if you know what you are doing but it comes with some risk.  Also if your installation is obviously new and shiny, then your EWOF inspector should ask for a copy of the compliance certificate that would of been supplied by your installer, so you might come unstuck when you cannot produce one.

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On 3/10/2022 at 2:41 PM, CarpeDiem said:

The legal frame work is the:  Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010

The main standards that apply are:

  • AS/NZS 3000:2007 Part 2; and
  • AS/NZS 3004.2:2014

I might save you a bit of time...

There is no legal way to DIY install a grid connected certifiable system on a boat in New Zealand.  The exemption which applies to electrical work on private residences that you both own and personally live in, does not extend to boats or caravans even if it is your only place of residence.

While you can technically go out and buy all the parts, you need to be a certified electrician to do the physical installation.

It's obviously not impossible to DIY it if you know what you are doing but it comes with some risk.  Also if your installation is obviously new and shiny, then your EWOF inspector should ask for a copy of the compliance certificate that would of been supplied by your installer, so you might come unstuck when you cannot produce one.

just a couple of additional comments, which have been noted in the past

1. The Electrical Safety Regs 2010 cite AS 3004.2 2008 as the reference standard for EWOF's

2. Boats built prior to 2008 are grandfathered, they do not have to be brought up to 3004.2 2008 in all respects, however you then run into the inspector's judgement as to what constitutes a "safe" AC installation for an EWOF to be issued.

3. Boats built 2008- 2014 need to comply with AS 3004.2 2008 for both AC and DC installations, post 2014 builds must comply with the 2014 revision. There is not much difference between the 2

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Is there anything to applies to the installation of batteries? Does changing to LiPO batteries require any standards to be adhered to?

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Yes. But NZ regs are not up to date with lithium batts yet. They likely will conform to the ABYC and European standards. Currently you must have an audible  and visual alarm at the normal operation location of the vessel that warns the operator of a faulty and impending disconnect (bms turning the batt off for any reason).

You also need to consider that standard batt fuses don't work, you need to upgrade to a fuse with AIC ratings of 20000 amps. That really means class T fuses. 

Alternators need to have temp sensing, so mostly that means external regulators like balmar or wakespeed. Not to do this will result in alternator failure. Alt needs a load dump system.

All charge sources (shorepower, wind, solar, genset etc) need to be able to be properly programed for lithium,  or replaced.

Because of all this, there is no such thing as a "drop in Lithium" battery!

For a basic understanding,  I'd strongly recommend anyone thinking of this read the "drop  in lithium, be an educated consumer" document on the marine how to website. IMO Rod Collins is one of THE authorities on this.

I'm out in the boat, but I can post the NZ reg battery requirements on Sunday or Monday when I'm back home.

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7 hours ago, TCat said:

Is there anything to applies to the installation of batteries? Does changing to LiPO batteries require any standards to be adhered to?

LiPo doesn't really have a place on a boat as a fixed installation unless you've got some kind of bespoke electrical requirement like a 60v bow thruster?

Lots of boats have LiPo batteries on them these days, but these are in the form of auxiliary batteries for an electric tender outboard. So not part of the boats electrical system. 

There's no legislation in NZ that prohibits you installing your own LiPo or any other chemistry so long as you stay under 60v DC peak power.  However the legislation still requires that it is designed and installed by a competent person.

As soon as your solution (or any part of it) goes over 60v DC it requires an certified electrician.

So you can diy your battery upgrade if you know what you are doing and realistically that would mean following and understanding the regs IT mentioned. 

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20 hours ago, CarpeDiem said:

LiPo doesn't really have a place on a boat as a fixed installation unless you've got some kind of bespoke electrical requirement like a 60v bow thruster?

Lots of boats have LiPo batteries on them these days, but these are in the form of auxiliary batteries for an electric tender outboard. So not part of the boats electrical system. 

There's no legislation in NZ that prohibits you installing your own LiPo or any other chemistry so long as you stay under 60v DC peak power.  However the legislation still requires that it is designed and installed by a competent person.

As soon as your solution (or any part of it) goes over 60v DC it requires an certified electrician.

So you can diy your battery upgrade if you know what you are doing and realistically that would mean following and understanding the regs IT mentioned. 

Hmm, did I not read this right? LiFePo4 makes an excellent house battery system if properly set up. Way lighter, way faster charge, no sulphation, does not need to be kept full, much more stable voltage, and much longer life.

short term, if not keeping a boat, AGM. Long term, lead is dead! (Except for cranking/winch/thruster batts!

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4 hours ago, Island Time said:

Hmm, did I not read this right? LiFePo4 makes an excellent house battery system if properly set up. Way lighter, way faster charge, no sulphation, does not need to be kept full, much more stable voltage, and much longer life.

short term, if not keeping a boat, AGM. Long term, lead is dead! (Except for cranking/winch/thruster batts!

LiPo (Lithium Polymer), which is what was asked about, is not LFP (Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4)).

They are different chemistries and different nominal voltages.  LiPo is also significantly more dangerous if you get it wrong... 

Perhaps TCat meant LFP? But the post/question was for LiPo...

Yes LFP is awesome for a boats electrical system and better than lead.

LiPo has a nominal voltage  that is generally incompatible with the normal electrics found on a boat.  Although there's lots of different chemistries in the LiPo family so some might be compatible, but I am not aware of any. 

Most electric outboards have LIPo batteries in them.  Which is the only reason why I do not own one.  They are also found in electric toy planes, toy cars, phones and drills. 

If you were installing an electric propulsion system then LiPo might be where you land... as it is a lot denser kg for Wh compared to lfp. 

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Quite right CD. I presumed he meant LiFePo4, which I shouldn’t have. IMO LiPo batteries have no place on a boat, and I wouldn’t have one.

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All NZ standards are available free of charge from public libraries. Considering the extortionate price to buy them, that's a good workaround! If they don't have it at your local library they'll be happy to order it from Auckland in a few days.

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