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syohana

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syohana last won the day on February 18

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  1. If you're worried about the metal seacocks being old and corroded, replace them with Trudesign type. If you're not sure, hit them with a hammer next time you're out of the water. If they break then you need new ones If the metal hasn't gone soft then keep them, just poke a stick up into them with a blob of waterproof grease on it and work them back and forth a few times a year so they don't seize up. The hose is usually too short to come off but replace it if it's getting old and make sure there are two tight stainless hose clamps in good condition on each end. One potential sa
  2. They did get Crumbs off the beach, and in style! About 20 people pushed her all the way down the beach by hand!!!! I tracked down this video on reddit, well worth watching: returning_a_beached_yacht_back_into_the_wild
  3. It was fun, plus there was a fair chance she'd smash into one of our boats if she broke loose so it wasn't entirely an act of charity! We eventually tracked down the owner in Wellington, they had only just bought the boat. Some pics below. A lot of the piles round here are rotten...
  4. Ouch! Crumbs was my old boat. She has a good strong hull, did they get her off OK? Meanwhile in a relatively sheltered bit of Kerikeri river opposite us a very big heavy timber launch on a pile mooring first broke both her bow lines before the storm even got started (they were more properly described as rotten strings) and was swinging around one pile bumping it so I went over in a small boat and put a bow line on her and attached an extra stern line from the other pile. Next morning after the storm that new bow line was holding fine but the pile at the other end had broken off completely
  5. MMSI starting in 5 denotes a vessel (not a shore station) registered either in NZ or another nearby country in Oceania. I believe within that "number space" 512 is allocated to NZ so any number starting with 512 would be nz registered and they are allocated starting from 1 so this would be the 2022nd vessel to register an MMSI in NZ. Seems like a plausible real MMSI. Or could be a made up or spoofed MMSI, but if someone just picked a random number then the chances are that it wouldn't start with 512 unless they really knew their stuff. If they knew their stuff well enough to use the
  6. One more thought - if you can't find a local, call Far North Radio on channel 60, they will know and probably be happy to give up to date info on the bar, or they will know who to ask.
  7. ... looking at the swell direction, the karikari peninsula should actually shield Houhora from most of it, only looks like 1m swell at most in the bay there. Still, check with a local, I've never been there...
  8. Oh, and happy new year to you too! see you soon!
  9. Monday looks like a day to enjoy Houhora. I'd wait until Tuesday, you should be able to make good progress that day. Wednesday looks good too though it's a bit far out to say for sure. windy.com gives great visualisations of what's happening and you can hop between all the different forecast models to see if they agree. The forecast is the big picture and doesn't do a good job of predicting sea breezes. Should be plenty of those with the sunshine forecast. You'll find the wind is different if you hug the coast, sea breezes will take over there if the prevailing wind dies, either replacing
  10. Check for barnacles unbalancing the prop first. Second make sure the shaft is exactly central in the shaft log (stern tube) first before doing the feeler gauge bit. Perhaps actually put wedges around the shaft to hold it dead centre. That might involve removing the water seal from around the shaft (unless it's a traditional stuffing box) so might have to be done out of water depending on the setup. Feeler gauges work. If you use an R&D coupling it has a special bolt head for using the feeler gauges on which makes it easier and more accurate. THe rubber coupling also helps absorb
  11. Like this: https://www.riggingdoctor.com/life-aboard/2016/2/28/solar-panel-mounting
  12. Consider a panel "hinged" to your top guardrail wire and outside it, either across the stern or beside the cockpit where dodgers would go. Have it vertical when sailing so it takes zero space, adjust the angle towards horizontal when moored (depending on height of the sun so don't raise it so much in winter). That will keep the coachroof free to walk on and the space taken by the panel is entirely outside the boat.
  13. Juice panels are either nominally 12v or 24v depending on the size. If the maximum "open circuit" output of your panels is around 36-40v then they are actually nominally 24v panels - the same voltage as the larger Juice panels. If you need smaller panels then two 12v panels can put in series to make the output nominally 24v (actually maximum around 36-40v open circuit). It is true that a higher voltage set up will give better low light performance because the panels will only charge when their output voltage is higher than the battery voltage. Even an MPPT controller will only charge
  14. Another thought... As a temporary solution to get you sailing this summer you could dump the heat exchanger, header tank and the leaky impeller pump and just cool the engine with raw sea water just going through the engine cooling circuit and into the exhaust. Throw in an anode and it should last at least a year or two until the rust gets it. Maybe it was originally raw water cooled anyway? Perhaps it was a lake boat on fresh water though? It's a good heavy thick block, won't rust through in a hurry and should cope with sea water for a while. You could simplify and get all that crap
  15. Another thought for the purpose of that hose. If it wasn't clipped up in the top corner of the coachroof then I'd say it was an emergency bilge pump. Close the seacock and open the valve on the end of the pipe, then the engine will pump water out of anywhere you put the end of that hose. I still think anti siphon based on where it goes though.
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