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Diesel Stabiliser


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What's the recommendation with Diesel Stabilisation on yachts?

We generally put in 20L every 2-4 months.  Which gives us about 30L in the tank.

But after CC (October) we put in 60L at Russell and have not added any since.

Thanks 

 

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keep tank full over winter or not using vessel a lot and use a decent biocide??prevention is  better than cure.Use vessel more often. All fuel is subject to the bug .Yes lives in petrol,more prone in diesel boat motors as they do not get the used same as cars/trucks 

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I put in shock dose of 1L into my 250L tank at start of season. Thereafter 100ml every time I refuel as a maintenance dose. So far so good.

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42 minutes ago, Fogg said:

I put in shock dose of 1L into my 250L tank at start of season. Thereafter 100ml every time I refuel as a maintenance dose. So far so good.

A shock dose of what?

I got some of this, but it's not a biocide. It's seems to just be for treating diesel in storage.  I am just conscious that all of the diesel in my tank is over 6 months old.

https://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/diesel-fuel-stabiliser

  • Prevents fuel from going stale when not used for up to 12 months
  • Prevents gum, sediments and polymer formations in the fuel
  • 2.5 times more economical than current fuel stabilisers
  • Stabilises fuel quality for improved economy and performance
  • Extends the life of fuel injectors, pumps and diesel catalysts
  • Optimised for diesel fuel
  • Prevents fuel system corrosion
  • Inhibits the tendency of Biodiesel to react with oxygen, thereby prolonging its shelf life
  • Economical when compared to replacing old or stale fuel.
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This stuff (been using it for 2-3 yrs). It killed off an early sign of bug in my previous boat after using a shock dose of 1L into a 130L diesel tank. Which saved me a lot of hassle. Thereafter 100ml each refill. Have continued using it in my new boat.

AB20646E-D4A5-4F56-8F81-B56344A8B4EC.jpeg

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This stuff, or similar.

If you think the diesel is going stale, you can either empty the tank and store the removed diesel, adding it back in to fresh fuel at, say, 1:4 ratio (1 part old to 4 parts new).  This assumes that you would go through that amount in six months or so.

If you have a big fixed tank and barely use it, you might consider emptying the main tank and fitting a small tote tank with a changeover valve between the main and the tote on the fuel line to the pump.  That way, your diesel is always reasonably fresh when you are not using the engine a lot (winter race series only sort of thing), but you still have good fuel capacity for cruising over summer.

Keep a small amount fo diesel in the main tank (say, 10 litres) so its sloshing around and inhibiting corrosion.  Drain it out as total loss before filling the tank for cruise season.

Get a funnel with a sieve in it to stop bits of crap getting into the tank and fuel system when you fill the tanks.

Use the stabiliser/biocide at all times.  Its cheap insurance.

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Aside from biocides for bug and keeping water out, we don't need to worry about our NZ diesel becoming stale, (or have less of a bang). We have a very good stable product in NZ. It is very close to a pure oil range with little in the way of volatiles to evaporate or oxidise. It is countries overseas useing the crap fuels that need to worry about it going stale. Many of the stabilizers and antismoking additives were made for those markets and you can easily spot the vehicles running on the cheap garbage, because the smoke from the stacks is horrific. A fuel additive could give anywhere from 10 to 20% fuel saving. Where as in NZ, additives do very little in that respect.
For our NZ diesel, there is a "T95" rating. This means that in a distillation process with heat of 360DegC applied, a recovery of 95% must be obtained.
Polycylic aromatic Hydrocarbons cannot be any greater than 11% by mass.
Oxidation stability can be no greater than 25g/m3 (or per 1000ltrs) of fuel.
Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters can be no greater than 7% by volume.

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On 29/03/2021 at 12:09 PM, aardvarkash10 said:

 

If you have a big fixed tank and barely use it, you might consider emptying the main tank and fitting a small tote tank with a changeover valve between the main and the tote on the fuel line to the pump.  That way, your diesel is always reasonably fresh when you are not using the engine a lot (winter race series only sort of thing), but you still have good fuel capacity for cruising over summer.

 

If you do this, make sure not to forget to sort the return line as well. 

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23 hours ago, BOIGuy said:

Until the refinery shuts? 

As I understand it, the fuel will be from Singapores refinery, which also uses the same high quality crude.

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23 hours ago, CarpeDiem said:

I will take the stabiliser back and swap it for a biocide

Reads the back lable. there is a chance it has biocide in it. The biocides are so toxic that they are not sold on there own undiluted. They are always sold in a cleaner or stabilizer. So chances are your product may already have it. And it certainly won't hurt the fuel having a stabilizer added even if it does not need it.

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