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Rudder Bushings - Labour estimate


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1 hour ago, Island Time said:

Hourly rates are always "per man hour". That is standard practice.

concur.  Ever has it been thus for automotive, building, plumbers and boatbuilders (among others).  If a job is quoted at 16 hours, its the tradies' call whether to staff that at one person for two days, or four people for half a day.  If you just ask for an hourly rate, you get the rate per labour hour.

Zoza's point remains valid though - everyone should be clear on what is being requested and quoted for and what costs are covered in the quote.  A document makes that clear for everyone.

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9 minutes ago, aardvarkash10 said:

 

Zoza's point remains valid though - everyone should be clear on what is being requested and quoted for and what costs are covered in the quote.  A document makes that clear for everyone.

I also reckon shouting the lads a few beers on a Friday goes down well and creates good camaraderie between you the client, and the tradesman/men! I did this while my previous yacht was being refurbished and it went down well.

In the end, while business is business, we are all human, and prone to eff ups and misunderstandings, but it's amazing what a cold one at the end of the working week can do to discuss things and sort it all out...
You can even get good quality 0.00% booze these days...

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On 24/01/2022 at 9:49 AM, Black Panther said:

There businesses then there are businesses.  Recently had topside painted. They gave a competitive quote based on long conversation about what I wanted and expected.  They did a great job and I paid. Both parties happy.

A few years back asked for a quote from a nearby business. Agreed. When the bill came it was nearly 6x higher than quote.  Reason: oh we thought we'd do this other work as well. Never been back and tell others to steer clear.

The commerce commision is crystal clear.

What is a quote?

A quote is an offer to do a job for a certain price.

If the customer accepts the quote, then there is a contract for you to do the work for that price. If there is extra work involved that was not covered by the original quote, you must have agreement from the customer to change the price.

What is an estimate?

An estimate is the nearest price, or range of prices, that you can give based on past experience.

If there may be any significant variation from the estimated price, you should make this, and the nature of the possible variation, very clear to the customer. All limits and conditions must be clearly spelled out. You must make the estimate honestly, based on reasonable grounds and assumptions.

 

We are pretty trusting as Kiwis but the key here is asking the right questions, especially for big jobs confirmation in writing; Is this a quote or an estimate?

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Do unnecessary work and charge for it. I guess it's unfair to brand all lawyers but the last few years I was working it was definitely on the increase,  and it only takes a small number to taint the whole profession. 

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Hi all, first time on this forum for me.

I see our business has been mentioned before https://www.supplyservices.co.nz/acm-composite-bearing-materials/

We supply a lot of machined to spec components for the marine industry. Rudder bushes, stern tube bushes, winch bearings etc.

Feel free to contact us, we will quote your custom parts at a fixed rate. We will work out all of the correct crush fits, epoxy fits and running clearances for your bearings. 

We are engineering plastics experts and can help with your material selection.

Rudder bushes.JPG

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Okay thought it best to update this post.

The boat came out of the water and and I was on hand to watch and learn the process, never having done that before and to see if I could help with the now dreaded, potential nightmare rudder removal.

So the rudder came out with some persuasion but all in all, relatively easily. The diagnosis was pretty instant. Dan from Weber Marine suggested that the grease the last "repair person" had used to resolve the problem had just made it worse. Swelling the plastic bearings.

 

So I spent 3 hours of hard yakka sanding out the scores on the stainless rudder shaft, to a mirror like surface while Dan washed out the bearings and carefully sanded out a proper clearance (and finshed off my shaft sanding). One thing was that he found some small cracking on top where the tiller attatches that underneath was LARGE cracking, a pending failure was in our future.

He organised a same day weld repair from another contractor up there (which was unreal).After a few test fittings and adjustments the rudder was back in the boat after approx 5 hours of labour. About 1/5 the estimated cost.

So it was an AWESOME result. The boat feels like an F1 car versus the truck it previousley felt like and is a joy to sail. 

A huge thank you to Dan from Weber Marine!!!

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7 hours ago, Rgvkiwi said:

Okay thought it best to update this post.

The boat came out of the water and and I was on hand to watch and learn the process, never having done that before and to see if I could help with the now dreaded, potential nightmare rudder removal.

So the rudder came out with some persuasion but all in all, relatively easily. The diagnosis was pretty instant. Dan from Weber Marine suggested that the grease the last "repair person" had used to resolve the problem had just made it worse. Swelling the plastic bearings.

 

So I spent 3 hours of hard yakka sanding out the scores on the stainless rudder shaft, to a mirror like surface while Dan washed out the bearings and carefully sanded out a proper clearance (and finshed off my shaft sanding). One thing was that he found some small cracking on top where the tiller attatches that underneath was LARGE cracking, a pending failure was in our future.

He organised a same day weld repair from another contractor up there (which was unreal).After a few test fittings and adjustments the rudder was back in the boat after approx 5 hours of labour. About 1/5 the estimated cost.

So it was an AWESOME result. The boat feels like an F1 car versus the truck it previousley felt like and is a joy to sail. 

A huge thank you to Dan from Weber Marine!!!

I love hearing stories like this.
Weber Marine are up there at Gulf Harbour where I keep my boat (the one I'm sailing not refurbishing LOL)
Another recommendation I can make up there is Gulf Harbour Rigging (Rob and Phil, great guys), and the Hardstand guys.   

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