Jump to content

madyottie

Members
  • Content Count

    933
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    10

madyottie last won the day on January 13 2018

madyottie had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

57 Good

About madyottie

  • Rank
    Strike 3. Woods Strike 18 Trimaran
  • Birthday 21/06/1972

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://manukausailing.blogspot.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Deepest Darkest Waikato
  • Interests
    Sailing. Winning. 'nuff said.

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. This is the RWO version, available from NSB in the UK. Or you could just use a Ronstan RF58. It's a swiveling cleat with a stainless deadeye instead of a sheave, I've just bought one to end the mainsheet on a Noelex 22, which probably has similar loads.
  2. Bruce Kirby, designer of the famous Laser, has passed away in Ottawa. He was 92. Edit: (showing my recent time out of the class) He was awarded almost US$7million earlier this year after a very long legal battle with Laser Performance Europe and Quarter Moon, who were allegedly building non compliant Lasers and not paying royalties, or something. What a sad way to destroy a legacy.
  3. Almost got the brand spanking new trailer finished. It's been a long road, trying to use the old parts, and failing miserably. Just a couple more nylocks to go, then the boat gets mobile again. Would put pics up, but didn't think about it and suddenly it was night.
  4. Well that was insightful.
  5. I haven't been on here in a couple of months, but it seems all the class forums have disappeared? Or am I looking in the wrong place? I use FB all the time, I find it easy to navigate, and it makes suggestions relevant to your interests. Usually.
  6. Pulled the plate out of a Marten Noelex a few times, I don't remember there being anything special around the pin. Honestly can't remember how we got it in or out these days, but I know it was a hella heavy once it hit the floor! If you have the boat "lifted" I'd be checking the entire centreboard, I can remember one of the Auckland Marten boats had the board crack, then the steel insides rusted and expanded, jamming it solid in the case. That boat (Spasmodic) later underwent a major refit, including a daggerboard conversion, and is still racing today. Funnily enough it's the boat th
  7. Wait, this was a thing? If you do it again, I can think of another 22 class that could muster up a fleet. From memory, not a million miles away performance wise either.
  8. Inspiration for American Magic. Too soon?
  9. I was given something similar last year for a birthday or something. Surprisingly effective if you're sitting in the flow of cooled air, but didn't seem to actually cool the room. I've been told that the best way to cool a boat on a windless day is a black polythene sheet suspended just above the main hatch. Apparently the heat causes some type of convection through the cabin. * * I've never tried it, if it's that hot, go swimming or something.
  10. I'm fairly sure Misty Clipper used to belong to a guy I knew. He really liked it, and it seemed to perform ok. From memory they were middle of the bunch of Whangarei keelboats. I know that they were kicking back relaxing on a stupidly windy Sail Rock race while we were white-knuckling it in Astro.
  11. Are the aft sides actually a concave section as they appear in some pics? or is that just optical illusion? I'd been thinking about ways to gain aerodynamic advantage, one obvious one is to angle the flat bottom down, thereby generating vertical "push", and I'd wondered about using hullform, since the apparent wind is always forward of the beam, either using concave sides, which could be angled to generate forward thrust, or perhaps tunnels through the hull, which could be optimised to whatever the designed apparent wind angle would be. I'd be quite interested to hear a bit more abo
  12. Late to the party as always, but here's my tiny spoke... Something you can take home to work on is very useful - as long as you have a big enough car, and big enough lawn. No antifoul or mooring costs either. One downside to trailer boats tho, is people can tell if you're out, so maybe not great if you live in a dodgy area. There is a small fleet (4-5 on average) of Noelex 22's racing in Auckland, presently at Manukau YMBC with the Hartley 16's and 12 foot skiffs. They're all heading to a Waikato duck pond this weekend, which is something you just can't do easily in a keelboat. Stil
  13. As a young R Class sailor I asked the same question, our rudder was transom mounted, some others were on frames. The answers varied, but generally the benefits were, in order... When twin wired downhill the angle between the tiller and the extension was wider, making for better control. The 'board and rudder are further apart, so a little less twitchy. There's less tiller in the boat, so more space when running to the other side. And that was it, really. All valid reasons, all from the '92 Leander in Lyttelton.
  14. As it happens, I'm looking for a Noelex crew tomorrow arvo. Details in Crew Find section.
  15. Looking for a passenger/ string puller for a there-and-back race (about 2-3hours) in the Noelex 22 tomorrow, Sunday 9/8/20. Start around midday. Weymouth Yacht Club, Manukau, out to the Airport area and back. Boat still being rebuilt, but floats and sails well.
×
×
  • Create New...