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1 hour ago, lateral said:

My boat always smelt slightly of diesel until l glassed over the ss tanks with flexible epoxy. Made them removable at same time. Hoping never to have to go back there....

where do you guys vent tank to? I went to under coaming  in cockpit. Need a a fitting though.

Live in fear of bug.

Vent at aft end of cockpit halfway down to cockpit sole and only about 40mm out from the front of the cockpit seat so you bash your knees of calfs on it. Only about 400mm up from cockpit sole.

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I my view, in nearly every tank installation, there is a design flaw. The Fuel line does not come from or go down to the very bottom of the tank. The idea is that it then does not pick up water. That

I'll agree with that. Developed pin holes in the fuel tank on my Cav 32. Had to remove the engine to get the fuel tank out. Had the same happen in my present boat, tank is in under saloon seat. 

solution easier than you think,use the boat and keep tank full,

1 hour ago, lateral said:

My boat always smelt slightly of diesel until l glassed over the ss tanks with flexible epoxy. Made them removable at same time. Hoping never to have to go back there....

where do you guys vent tank to? I went to under coaming  in cockpit. Need a a fitting though.

Live in fear of bug.

Aft end of cockpit about 400mm up from cockpit sole and about 40mm out from the front of the cockpit seat so you can't skin your knees or calfs

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Diesel bug requires water to survive. SS tanks are the worst,  as they condensate on a cold day when warm diesel is returned from the engine. These days, most production boats use plastic tanks, which helps. Better still, is built in fibreglass tanks - the box section can add structural integrity to the boat, where as strapped down tanks reduce it.

Best place for a breather is central and high up on the transom - fumes go overboard, less chance of water ingress.

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2 hours ago, chariot said:

If i have 400mm of water in my cockpit with 2X50 drain holes the last thing I am going to be worried about is water ingress into a fuel breather. 

A single wave can do that. Ever been pooped?

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2 hours ago, harrytom said:

solution easier than you think,use the boat and keep tank full,

Exactly what I do. Top tank up after every outing.

 

1 hour ago, Island Time said:

A single wave can do that. Ever been pooped?

No, never been pooped, but never been offshore. Done sh---t loads of coastal but never have that volume in the cockpit.

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4 hours ago, chariot said:

If i have 400mm of water in my cockpit with 2X50 drain holes the last thing I am going to be worried about is water ingress into a fuel breather. 

I've got an open transom hence I put  it high as possible. 

Might run it all the way back to end of coaming ceiling then drop to gunnel level at transom.

Probably about 5-600mm.

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I my view, in nearly every tank installation, there is a design flaw. The Fuel line does not come from or go down to the very bottom of the tank. The idea is that it then does not pick up water. That is just fine and dandy if there is another way to empty the tank of water on the bottom.
As said in above posts, the Water is actually where the Bug lives. The Bug can be either Algae or Bacteria or both even. Both live in the water. Algae does not need Diesel to live on. Bacteria feeds on the Fuel. Very simply, remove water and keep it out and you will never have a problem. (unless you introduce dirty fuel from a contaminated supply).
The best idea if it can be done, is to have a part of the bottom of the tank that is lower and water will eventually run to and accumulate. A drain tap fitted to that low point then allows removal of water. Then next best is to have the Fuel line run to the bottom and have a really good Fuel/water separator. Good ones like Racor are very expensive. You could be spending in the realms of $300 and much more depending on size. The filter elements are not expensive and are high quality and you can now get elements that are hydrophobic, so water will not pass through at all.
You need to keep regular inspections to ensure water does not accumulate in the filter. Racor also has a bowl that will send a signal to a light or alarm if water fills the bowl.

The simple fact to remember is, No Water, No Bug.

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