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The Ultimate Dinghy Painter


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#11 Kevin McCready

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 08:29 PM

A youtube vid of you using your sennit would be great Matt. I'm still finding it hard to imagine how you deploy and set.


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#12 idlerboat

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 12:44 PM

(Decorative sennits are a long standing maritime tradition, they can be extremely complex and often take the form of "mats". Most detailed knot books will have a few chapters on them).

 

I have a stretchy rubber loop (they use them as an addition to rope in some truck tie downs)  as suspension when dragging the dingy. I tie it on with a bowline on the bite...leave a little slack and then tie the end also to the mothership..(just in case it beaks). It is a great addition also if you have the dingy along side with fenders and a stern line as it lessens the shock load when those pesky jet skis ...and other things go passed.


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There is only two substances..stuff and glue...and even glue is made of stuff,,
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#13 harrytom

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:14 PM

Huh - why cut it at home (umm we are living aboard now)??

 

I just noticed Burnsco are having a special on floaty bits of rope, might start theere.

If you can cut it with a semi blunt knife,then you cut it from a prop,getting quite experienced at now,4th time in 12 months,water is still warm compared to july last year :razz:


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#14 BMW56

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 10:06 AM

I had the recent experience of losing my dinghy, not because the painter gave way, but because the D-ring pulled off the front of the dinghy. One new dinghy later I have been experimenting with painters and towing bridles.

I was surprised how much better the dinghy tows using a bridle attached to the tow points on either side, as compared to a single point on the bow. A long tow line helps too.. The bridle clips on with snap shackles and is only put on for towing. The tow line is 10m of 12mm polypropylene braid with the bridle permanently attached via a stainless ring that can slide along, allowing for an even tow despite wind, currents, etc. This setup stays on the yacht, so doesn't get in the way when commuting back and forth to the mooring. Two minutes to clip on before we leave. The painter is a much shorter 10mm braid and is only used for tying up. It stays attached to the dinghy all the time and is short enough not to get in the way when handling the dinghy.

So in my case i have decided on separate solutions for each purpose, rather than make one piece of string do both. Seems to be working very well so far and has managed to stay clear of the prop.
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#15 Knot Me... maybe

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 10:34 AM

Just a heads up for you to keep an eye on BMW.

 

Polyprop suffers badly with fibre friction i.e. while all the fibres like working together to make a rope the individual fibres don't much like the ones next to them that much and would prefer no touching. When they touch and are forced to rub on each other they generate heat and heat kills PP.  PP is also a low temp material i.e. it's not a fan of heat and can turn very grumpy at lowish temps.

 

So all that means PP does not like being rubbed that much so keep an eye on wear that maybe caused by you sliding ring. Also watch out for cyclic loading PP around corners All of which there are bits of in a towing system like yours, which is one I personally do like a lot.

 

So watch for wear on longer trips, it can pop up quite fast especially if any heat is generated.

 

What you can do to minimise all that is let it get lots of water i.e. if it tows dry slow and let is get wet now and again. If it gets wet from splashing that's very good, long may it continue to do so.

 

 


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#16 island time

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 10:58 AM

A youtube vid of you using your sennit would be great Matt. I'm still finding it hard to imagine how you deploy and set.

here you go Kevin, pretty crap video, but you'll get the idea:
Harness and sennit:

And the sennit and clip


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There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats


#17 Kevin McCready

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 11:38 AM

Thanks Matt

Those vids were great.


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#18 BMW56

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 01:56 PM

Thanks KM. That's good advice. I chose the polypropylene on the basis if it being lightweight, and therefore not too much of a sea anchor with the longer length, and also moderately stretchy. There always seem to be pros and cons. I used to tow my old dinghy on a much shorter painter, and it danced around a lot more than the new one does. I have actually used two stainless rings together to spread the load over a greater surface area. Seems to work fine though it took some experimenting to find the right length for the bridle. I started off a bit too long and the rings didn't slide easily, but it finds it's sweet spot quite happily now. At this time of year the rope doesn't get a chance to dry, but good advice to give it an occasional dip on a hot summer day if it's been towing above the water. I'll certainly be keeping an eye out for wear. I suspect my insurance company wouldn't be too keen on another claim for a lost dinghy!
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