Jump to content

First Time possible buyer


Recommended Posts

Righto long time stalker first time poster.

 

Long story short, we've been wanting to get into cruising for the last 3 years and have been hunting high & low for a boat that ticks out boxes.

 

Having found one, we're keen. it's sub 10k 28 foot.

 

Just need help finding a good surveyor.

 

The next catch is. I haven’t sailed in 10+ years and even then it wasn’t very much. Since then I have read a tonne.

 

The big question I wanted to ask here.

 

Take a punt and get a boat then learn as we go building on my very very limited experience and theory (I have a mate who has LOTS of experience and also offering come along for the odd day trip)?

 

Or flag it and get more experience.

 

I have a LOT of power boating experience. So water & weather reading I am very comfortable with. Sailing not so much.

 

Feedback appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nike strategy - just do it.

 

I made the jump from Sabot to windsurfer, and 27 years later to 26' keeler. You have the advantage of recognising and understanding sea and wind conditions, and presumably anchoring/berthing/VHF experience. Sailing for cruising isn't that hard to learn. Learning how to handle adverse conditions would be advisable but until then just pick the right conditions to go out in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, JFDI - You'll have a great time. :-)

 

It's a launch anyhow until you put the flappy raggie things up and with a keel she'll be easier to handle.

Pop along to the Richmond YC to the Friday Night Specials - give it a go sailing tuition.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Re your boat purchase, a couple of things that will make your cruising a whole lot easier is having a furling jib/genoa, and all lines leading back to the cockpit so that everything can be controlled from there (other than getting the anchor up and down - unless it's powered = bonus).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Re your boat purchase, a couple of things that will make your cruising a whole lot easier is having a furling jib/genoa, and all lines leading back to the cockpit so that everything can be controlled from there (other than getting the anchor up and down - unless it's powered = bonus).

 

Yeah it's a cruiser proper, inboard, furler etc

 

http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=619321884

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two points:

1. Get her surveyed - there are heaps of links to surveyors within the Crew website - just search for them.

2. Get her surveyed - not the same point (kinda), I know it costs a lot when you're only??? paying $10K but at least (especially given your inexperience) you'll know whats wrong with her. And there will be things wrong with her. She's old.

3. Join Richmond Yacht Club - do the Friday Night Friendlies - you'll meet lottsa people in a friendly environment, go on different boats and learn heaps. Doesn't matter where your boat (or potential boat) is moored, RYC Fridays are well worth it. Trust me on that one - from someone who did something similar to what you're contemplating.

4. Get the family (don't know your circumstances so forgive me if this isn't relevant) into RYC or a training programme as well. Penny whiting etc.

5. Never ever shout at the wife or children when performing tricky maneuvers (like opening beer bottles while attempting to anchor :lol: ). Period. End of story. DON'T DO IT.

6. Be prepared to spend way more money than you think on annual maintenance etc. It's just the way it is.

7. Go for it.

 

Okay 7 points................. :wave:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Two points:

1. Get her surveyed - there are heaps of links to surveyors within the Crew website - just search for them.

2. Get her surveyed - not the same point (kinda), I know it costs a lot when you're only??? paying $10K but at least (especially given your inexperience) you'll know whats wrong with her. And there will be things wrong with her. She's old.

3. Join Richmond Yacht Club - do the Friday Night Friendlies - you'll meet lottsa people in a friendly environment, go on different boats and learn heaps. Doesn't matter where your boat (or potential boat) is moored, RYC Fridays are well worth it. Trust me on that one - from someone who did something similar to what you're contemplating.

4. Get the family (don't know your circumstances so forgive me if this isn't relevant) into RYC or a training programme as well. Penny whiting etc.

5. Never ever shout at the wife or children when performing tricky maneuvers (like opening beer bottles while attempting to anchor :lol: ). Period. End of story. DON'T DO IT.

6. Be prepared to spend way more money than you think on annual maintenance etc. It's just the way it is.

7. Go for it.

 

Okay 7 points................. :wave:

 

1. Yup will be doing just that

2. Understood

3. Have been eying it for awhile

4. Only me and the fiance who will be both joining RYC potentially

5. She is used to bellowed instructions usually when she is hooked up to a kingi or other large toothy critter on our fishing trips and when she is on the rod everything becomes tricky. Smiles at the end though :D

6. Having owned & sold powered boat I am well aware of Bust Out Another Thousand

7. Have contacted them to arranging a view so we can decided on if we want to haul and survey.

 

Did pop down and look at her from the shore after work. Can't wait to get on her and have a look around.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They reckon the two best days of a boat owners life are the day you buy the boat and the day you sell the boat. I dunno …. I reckon they're only half right (as long as you do your homework before you plunk your money down).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good advice above - the other other thing is:

 

- there are often posts here from first-time buyers who have taken the plunge only to find they have trouble getting insurance for their new purchase

 

- possibly this affects the low-cost end of the market more because it is more likely to be a less-well-known (or totally unknown) design therefore harder to address the "make and model" section of the form which starts to make the insurance companies uneasy

 

- also there now seems to be a real reluctance on the part of insurance companies to go near anything kept on a swing mooring, which again is often part of the package for those on a budget (i.e. the 10k boats are less likely to be kept on a 100k marina berth)

 

- it does seem that you will not get past the go stage with the insurance company without a survey. Ah but you are getting a survey! True but the objective of that as you consider the potential purchase is to highlight all possible defects and areas of risk to allow you to make your decision and perhaps use these as leverage to get the price reduced. You may find it is less useful as a way of demonstrating to an insurance company that this is an attractive risk for them to take on board.

 

Others may be able to comment on how they have dealt with that last aspect - I am sure it is a well-trodden path - possibly provide them with the survey report with a commitment to getting any significant issues professionally repaired?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...