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Nearly as good as taking a packed lunch to the launching ramp


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I think it's been many years since there was any truth in "all boats swing the same" and even then, I think it was a story told to children at night..

 

Owhanake Bay had boats pointing in all directions at once, we were quietly doing 360s all night, thankfully it wasn't too full.

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Our boat sails all over the place when on the pick. It's annoying when you are trying to sleep and have to listen to water rushing past the bow, but quite funny to watch from a nearby boat.

You can count the gust's in, then watch it lean over and steam past the anchor like it's carrying full sail...

I wonder if a small drogue off the stern would help?

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An great advantage when you have two masts. The mizzen is excellent at that. Although you do have to consider the considerable extra drag if you are in Gale strength or higher winds.
We were watching a couple of Marklines dancing all over the place. Man do they scoot around at speed.
Yes a drogue or even a small stern anchor would help. But if you are in Auckland, I don't know how you would deploy either behind you when someone drops their anchor right on your stern and another too each side of you.

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Our boat sails all over the place when on the pick. It's annoying when you are trying to sleep and have to listen to water rushing past the bow, but quite funny to watch from a nearby boat.

You can count the gust's in, then watch it lean over and steam past the anchor like it's carrying full sail...

I wonder if a small drogue off the stern would help?

We do exactly the same but cover 1mt more each time ;)

 

I tried stuff here, there and places you just don't want to know. I found the best was a bucket hanging off about 300mm of sting that was off the anchor warp about 750mm deep. When she goes back in that bucket will be a small fabric drogue (just storage reasons) set up on a small line that has a small sinker to help it stay down there.

 

That worked the best of all the fiddling I tried for that very reason.

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Our boat sails all over the place when on the pick. It's annoying when you are trying to sleep and have to listen to water rushing past the bow, but quite funny to watch from a nearby boat.

You can count the gust's in, then watch it lean over and steam past the anchor like it's carrying full sail...

I wonder if a small drogue off the stern would help?

Light boat or too much 'sail area' forward. Normal machines get a couple of furlers added and turn into sailers at anchor. I know , I done it.

What works is shifting the fairlead forward ie longer fairlead , haul the rode out on a bowsprit say, or cut down on stuff forward.

also a anchor buddy type thing dampens yaw down.

 

For the month away we just had , back on tuesday, we only had 2 anchorwankers and one Generatorwanker . Pretty good really. BOI, Great Barrier, quite a bit of time on the coast.

The anchorwankers come into a wide open bay with giant holes and dump their pick on mine , hang back on my bow. Why? why there? weird. I deliberately do not over anchor metreage wise. These guys can only have 1.5 times the depth 2:1 at absolute most. spoons.

Mind you the last night was in Izzy bay because we were in denial and didn't want to go home, and my wife ended up doing semaphore at the boat that anchored behind us. 4 gusting 6 , he dragged right across the bay. Thank god they had their lifejackets on. Eventually he woke up to the messages or perhaps it was just that he was side on to the wind and a couple of boatlengths off the rocks, perhaps it was fate or just a 'feeling' he had. Anyway alls well that ends well.

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 Izzy bay

 4 gusting 6 , he dragged right across the bay. 

How?  

I mean, I've dragged (Oneroa, limited warp in snugglely circumstances that was 10 but built to 25 knots)

But Izzy is sticky... sh*t... it's nasty stuff to get off the anchor once you manage to get it on the deck.

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And then the next day they went back to Whitianga in very challenging Easterly conditions. I wonder if they made it...

We watched about a 9m bridge cat swingng about on its anchor in the cove at GMI New Years Eve. The skipper of the neighbouring cat was concerned it was going to drag and hit him, so came across to Pulse to get some help to sort the problem.

 

Mr DT (previously Two2Tango) accompanied him to the offending vessel, where they weighed the small plough anchor on the end of just over 1m of chain, and attempted to re-anchor. The thing wouldn't steer into the wind (over 30kts), so they ended up tying her up to one of the house boats.

 

Thing is, they had left their boat unattended, rudders down (they were not able to be raised) helm not tied back, in winds forcast to be knarly, on 1.8m of chain and an undersized anchor.

 

Really have to wonder about the intelligence of some people sometimes.

I know we all make mistakes, and when I first joined here, I did so in order to learn what I did not know. And when in doubt, one asks questions to ensure they keep themselves and others safe.

 

TBH, I was gobsmacked. 

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Light boat or too much 'sail area' forward. Normal machines get a couple of furlers added and turn into sailers at anchor. I know , I done it.

What works is shifting the fairlead forward ie longer fairlead , haul the rode out on a bowsprit say, or cut down on stuff forward.

also a anchor buddy type thing dampens yaw down.

 

 

Light boat (cedar core 830) and no anchor fairlead as yet. Small self tacker lashed down on the foredeck and that's it. Had a spare chain balled up and sent down the line to reduce the turning circle but it's more the 'Accelerate in a straight line like a Top Fuel Dragster' that it seems to prefer. Helm straight it was worse but lashed to one side didn't make a lot of difference.

I like the idea of a little drogue or brake on the warp. might have to try that one thanks K.M

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How?  

I mean, I've dragged (Oneroa, limited warp in snugglely circumstances that was 10 but built to 25 knots)

But Izzy is sticky... sh*t... it's nasty stuff to get off the anchor once you manage to get it on the deck.

Izzy was the most common bay for complaints of anchor dragging. As soon as someone came in with the comment "the anchor I have dragged" my question was, "were you in Izzy Bay?"

Because Izzy is such a popular bay for anchoring and because of the bottom type, it has turned to that sticky ooze and anchors pull right through it instead of digging down. Anchors hold by digging down. The greater the pull that results in the anchor dragging should always result in it digging deeper till it stops dragging. But a bottom like Izzy, the muck no longer provides enough resistance to cause the anchor to go down. There is also likely a harder pan of some material under that mud that the anchor slides over.

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Izzy was the most common bay for complaints of anchor dragging. As soon as someone came in with the comment "the anchor I have dragged" my question was, "were you in Izzy Bay?"

Because Izzy is such a popular bay for anchoring and because of the bottom type, it has turned to that sticky ooze and anchors pull right through it instead of digging down. Anchors hold by digging down. The greater the pull that results in the anchor dragging should always result in it digging deeper till it stops dragging. But a bottom like Izzy, the muck no longer provides enough resistance to cause the anchor to go down. There is also likely a harder pan of some material under that mud that the anchor slides over.

Huh.  Thank you for the explanation, I simply hadn't thought out the mechanics.  I've always found it's one of the hardest places to pull an anchor up because it seems to be sucked into the ooze (80 odd years of Pakuranga on sea with no holding tanks - doesn't bare thinking about)  I remember my little Spencer with bugger all freeboard dipping it's nose while I nearly broke my back once - unbelievable.

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How?  

I mean, I've dragged (Oneroa, limited warp in snugglely circumstances that was 10 but built to 25 knots)

But Izzy is sticky... sh*t... it's nasty stuff to get off the anchor once you manage to get it on the deck.

A post that would suggest you have a good technique, well done you.

 

As Wheels said Izzy Bay is a known anchoring hazard. Bottom like veggie soup so you need to get down thru that or use a soft bottom lovin anchor like a danforth pattern. Using smarts is also another option.

 

There are a few spots that come up time after time when people ask us about anchoring issues they have. Izzy Bay and Fitzroy being damn near top of the list, if not top.

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Light boat (cedar core 830) and no anchor fairlead as yet. Small self tacker lashed down on the foredeck and that's it. Had a spare chain balled up and sent down the line to reduce the turning circle but it's more the 'Accelerate in a straight line like a Top Fuel Dragster' that it seems to prefer. Helm straight it was worse but lashed to one side didn't make a lot of difference.

 

Exactly what we get. It can be a PITA at times.

Interesting comment re the rudder, again I got exactly the same even with the large rudder we have, I wouldn't have expected that.

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I saw more than one boat over Xmas with a small riding sail off the backstay

Saw quite a few of these on larger yachts in the Caribbean / Central Am

Just a right angle triangle of canvas about 1m on two short sides with eyes in each corner, long edge parallel to backstay strops off bottom and square points and spare main halyard or topper on top point. One strop to end of boom other to stern.

They seemed to work but not sure about a light Ross boat, maybe try reverse set storm kite

Think I'll take one next time I go offshore as they are easy to make and don't take up any space

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Just a right angle triangle of canvas about 1m on two short sides with eyes in each corner,

Yeap that's my mainsail alright, with one reef in obviously :)

 

I tried a towel strapped off the end of the boom to get some idea. The boat accelerated even better.

 

It happens to us as our keels are a fair ways forward so at the end of the arc that allows the stern to 'flick' around using the keel as a pivot. Once flicked it presents a great angle to head back the other way and a tad faster.... winch I turn allows the stern to flick quicker and the process just continues.

 

My drogue on the rode theory is to stop the speed build up which reduces the flick so it won't stop it but it will slow it dramatically. I tried it off the stern but as they wobble around so much it struggled to set and stay so constantly.  But so far the drogue has only been a bucket or the tiny one off the life ring so it's still a work in progress. Hopefully FLC will sort it before I'm back in and then I don't have to  :thumbup:  

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