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A suitable yacht for offshore and coastal ,,,,help !


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Fair enough.  But for what reasons can you then refuse to buy? You find that the boat is not close winded enough for your tastes, or sluggish etc. kind of a subjective decision. 

 

DrWatson, This is exactly the point that i struggled with. I didn't think there was much wriggle room after the contract with the clause of  survey and sea trial was signed. I expected that once on the water if the boat sailed in general condition than the trial is passed.I expect I am naive "Again" ,   Island Time.

My only experience with boat purchase was in ,retrospect great.We answer a for sale add inn the buy and sale in 2006, We met the owner on the jetty and went for a wonderful sail and we were sold on the boat, A week later it went on the cradle and we looked over the hull and money was exchanged deal done with both parties very happy.

Little did i know then.

I understand the need to ensure the tire kickers don't waste brokers time.

Good to hear other views.

Thank you 

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Pros of steel - only one that I can see - it is strong. ( I owned a steel fishing boat for a long time)   Cons - never ending maintenance, cold noisy and slow (too heavy). Also not easy to modify.

Pros of steel - only one that I can see - it is strong. ( I owned a steel fishing boat for a long time)

 

Cons - never ending maintenance, cold noisy and slow (too heavy). Also not easy to modify.

 

You don't need a heavy boat to be comfortable at sea and they are always slow so you spend longer at sea for a longer uncomfortable time as passages are usually just means to an end. I sailed an Orams 53 to Tonga and that was over twice the weight of a 1220 or a Regardless and no more comfortable at sea.

 

It is important that a good cruising boat is a good sailer firstly for the pleasure that comes from a nice sailing boat and secondly to make passages in reasonable time and within good weather windows.

 

Around 40 ft is a good size.

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Hi Steve

We had a look at a Pacemaker in Whagarei with Vinings  http://www.vinings.co.nz/index.php?mact=V8,cntnt01,viewstock,1&cntnt01stocktype=Marine&cntnt01stocksubtype=Yacht&cntnt01price_low=100001&cntnt01price_high=200000&cntnt01order_by=price&cntnt01view_type=&cntnt01offset=10&cntnt01returnid=78&page=78

The hull is 6 mm below and 5 above waterline. What would be your take on the pros and cons on this.

Its probably on of the first to be build. I can see ventilation being a issue  on the south island but up north. Very small and few portholes This one has come back home from across the pacific 7 years ago. I have not sailed on a steel yacht this size and found it difficult to find information on ganleys. Happy to have a "heavy cruiser' but still able to sail and point like our cavalier 32 which by the way displaces aprox half a pacemaker. This one would need a bit of investment starting with more horsepower currently a Bukh 36. I had a number of chats with broker and could take it for  sail only after the contract is signed. I appreciate your comments.

 

Have recently been through the same process as yourself, and ended up buying a Ganley Timerider. Very similar to the Pacemaker. We were being quite choosey and wanted something that didn't just stack up against our criteria, but felt right as well.

 

Leaving aside all the issues of rust in hard to find places, which you have to take into account, and all the other personal preferences which you can change as you see fit, I've been quite impressed with ours.

 

We've done a bit of mileage, bought her in the Bay of Islands and sailed her down to Dunedin in two hops at the start of the Winter. Some good weather, some bad. Basics. A good sea boat in heavy weather, comfortable motion, fairly dry. Under sail she was a far better performer than I had thought she'd be, quite lively actually. Very manoeuvrable under both sail and power, surprisingly so given the weight (11.5 T). And as for the amount of useable space inside.........  There are a few wee quirks we have to bear in mind when sailing, but, we've yet to find a major vice.

 

All in all, and do bear in mind that this is just my personal opinion, the Ganleys around that sort of size - with the usual proviso of having been well constructed, maintained, and a functional interior layout - make excellent cruising boats.

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ended up buying a Ganley Timerider.

 

We've done a bit of mileage, bought her in the Bay of Islands and sailed her down to Dunedin .

Was that Waiora? If so I sailed on her in Tonga and was impressed with how well it sailed to windward on just the head sail. Tacked through 90 degrees (by compass) and kept up with a German boat motoring to windward.

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