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Enfin, Ganley 39


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Hi ,

 

Newbie here. Looking for any info on this yacht, https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/listing/2941950192?bof=frkHzxbZ

Seems like a lot of boat for the price. Im interested in some history of the boat who built her etc... from what I can find on the net quality can vary in the fit out. Im exploring purchase so any info greatly appreciated.

 

Cheers

 

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For a steel boat survey you must have a “plate thickness meter” and get into every spot. I once helped a friend prepare an old steel boat for the water again. As we were about to relaunch it was discovered by accident that a significant part of the hull was paper thin; it had rusted from the inside. Now I'm older and wiser. Old steel boats have also basically fallen apart after being hauled out for inspection. Don't be afraid to give the steel a good solid whack with the pointy end of a welders hammer. If the steel is in good condition it won't matter a jot. If it's thin, the hammer will go through.   

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While that's true Kevin, the owner is probably not going to be happy with holes punched into his Hull. So I would suggest a less aggressive means of testing.

Yes it's a good deal Lewis. There are many very good deals to be had at the mo and I suspect it could become more and more common, for a raft of reasons that are all coming together to pinch hard Boat owners struggling to keep a Boat.
The questions you need to ask is what are your sailing plans for the future. These are not fast boats, but more a Cruising vessel and well suited to take you off shore if you want. They have plenty of room.
However, she was launched in the mid 80's and that may mean old equipment. So make sure you consider that in your budget when you look at her. That could also be why she is cheap. If you have to update Sails, Electronics, Anchor winch and Sheet winches and maybe rigging, that suddenly makes the cheap part not so much.
But don't let those warnings put you off taking a look.
 

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1 hour ago, Kevin McCready said:

For a steel boat survey you must have a “plate thickness meter” and get into every spot. I once helped a friend prepare an old steel boat for the water again. As we were about to relaunch it was discovered by accident that a significant part of the hull was paper thin; it had rusted from the inside. Now I'm older and wiser. Old steel boats have also basically fallen apart after being hauled out for inspection. Don't be afraid to give the steel a good solid whack with the pointy end of a welders hammer. If the steel is in good condition it won't matter a jot. If it's thin, the hammer will go through.   

Hi, 

 

Thanks for the reply. We would be looking at putting her through a full survey which I would hope will show up any issues. Good advice! 

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8 minutes ago, wheels said:

While that's true Kevin, the owner is probably not going to be happy with holes punched into his Hull. So I would suggest a less aggressive means of testing.

Yes it's a good deal Lewis. There are many very good deals to be had at the mo and I suspect it could become more and more common, for a raft of reasons that are all coming together to pinch hard Boat owners struggling to keep a Boat.
The questions you need to ask is what are your sailing plans for the future. These are not fast boats, but more a Cruising vessel and well suited to take you off shore if you want. They have plenty of room.
However, she was launched in the mid 80's and that may mean old equipment. So make sure you consider that in your budget when you look at her. That could also be why she is cheap. If you have to update Sails, Electronics, Anchor winch and Sheet winches and maybe rigging, that suddenly makes the cheap part not so much.
But don't let those warnings put you off taking a look.
 

Thanks for the reply. Thats the exact reason for purchase, cruising with the family with the possibility of some offshore travel one day. The owner can supply a rigging survey, that should show any old gear I presume. However before going ahead we would be getting the hull surveyed as well. Im just apprehensive as it almost seems a bit to good to be true for the price. Also I dont want a big project. Im happy to have some costs as with any boat, but I dont want to be spending big money straight off the bat.

 

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33 minutes ago, lewis said:

TThe owner can supply a rigging survey, that should show any old gear I presume. However before going ahead we would be getting the hull surveyed as well. Im just apprehensive as it almost seems a bit to good to be true for the price. Also I dont want a big project. Im happy to have some costs as with any boat, but I dont want to be spending big money straight off the bat.

 

A survey commissioned by and for the owner is no insurance for you.  The only way to do this is to get a qualified person (or business) to carry out a full survey to your specification.  They will need to know intended use as a part of that and if off-shore in this yacht is your intention they need to know that.

For a steel yacht of that age and your intended use I'd go for a full rig inspection and report, a hull/deck/superstructure survey and a mechanical and systems survey (engine, gearbox/drive, electrical, electronics).  It will be pricey, but you have the reassurance and the surveyor's public liability insurance to fall back on if a problem presents later.

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24 minutes ago, aardvarkash10 said:

A survey commissioned by and for the owner is no insurance for you.  The only way to do this is to get a qualified person (or business) to carry out a full survey to your specification.  They will need to know intended use as a part of that and if off-shore in this yacht is your intention they need to know that.

For a steel yacht of that age and your intended use I'd go for a full rig inspection and report, a hull/deck/superstructure survey and a mechanical and systems survey (engine, gearbox/drive, electrical, electronics).  It will be pricey, but you have the reassurance and the surveyor's public liability insurance to fall back on if a problem presents later.

Fair point on the rigging inspection. A full survey was my intention. We basically have a total budget of about 60K. I am anticipating spending some money on her or whatever boat we end up with.

Edited by lewis
additional comment.
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4 hours ago, lewis said:

 

Fair point on the rigging inspection. A full survey was my intention. We basically have a total budget of about 60K. I am anticipating spending some money on her or whatever boat we end up with.

So you need to spread that as $40k for the purchase including survey one year insurance and three months mooring, and $20k for your first year operating/reconfiguring to suit you/deferred CAPEX.  It will vary a bit, but that is what I'm seeing and what friends/family have experienced.

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