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Wanted to borrow - 56mm flywheel nut socket for Yanmar 2QM20


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Bugger.  Removed the gearbag and found the flywheel is retained by this bloody thing, not the five-bolt system it should have.

Has anyone in Auckland got the correct socket or impact spanner for removing it?  Extra brownie points if you also have the flywheel puller.

Will pay in rum or cash!

IMG_20210405_093057~2.jpg

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It's usually undone by a Hammer and punch or chisel applied to the side of the nut. You can see where someone has had a go in the past.

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Ih and for a puller, just use a flat plate with two threaded rodes that go into the bolt holes each side and place the centre bolt enough threads back in to make it secure and then wind the outer rodes to place tension in the flywheel. When you run out ior thread. put a spacer between centre bolt and plate. It does not take a lot of force to free it. Although pullers are cheap and very handy to have in the tool box. I'd go buy one and then you have it.

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1 hour ago, wheels said:

It's usually undone by a Hammer and punch or chisel applied to the side of the nut. You can see where someone has had a go in the past.

This is true Wheels and the witness marks tell the story.

Unfortch, its difficult to get to the correct torque if you use the hammer and cold chisel for installation.

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The old Ford Transit has a 56mm spindle hub nut....

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/car-parts-accessories/tools-repair-kits/sockets/listing/3036755367?bof=EOozYSZJ

Bummer, just noticed the seller is in the UK! 🙄

Trade Tools has a 56mm Impact socket for $88...

Mytools has a slightly cheaper one, expensive for a one off use though...

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/car-parts-accessories/tools-repair-kits/sockets/listing/3040450805?bof=wBdKMytZ

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This is where I started with this, I remembered form my 4wd days that the spindle hub nuts on my various Toyotas were  50 something mm, turns out its 54, too small.

I had one of these cheapo sockets, its only for a spindle nut, so no huge torque, I think you could force fit this onto your 56mm nut, it'd be nice and tight, cheap and would work for doing it up once or twice.

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/car-parts-accessories/parts-other-makes/exterior/listing/3039887047?bof=tebqkhch

All depends on how "agricultural" you want to get...

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1 hour ago, aardvarkash10 said:

Unfortch, its difficult to get to the correct torque if you use the hammer and cold chisel for installation.

Is it a key way on the shaft? I expect it would be.
Is there no locking tab? It's a washer that has a little inner tab which locks into the keyway and the outer of the washer is then bent up against the side of the nut.
You don't have to be too accurate re tightening to a torque setting if it is. You could even spot a little thread lock on it to hold it from becoming loose. Not too much incase you want to be able to remove it again in the future.

Or try Auck engineering supplies and ask for a single impact socket. They are not usually expensive. However, you likely will only be able to get it in 3/4 drive and that means you then need an adaptor and then of course it all adds up.
There is also a Wheel Bearing nut socket available that is 54mm. They are 1/2 drive and made from a thinner profile high strength steel. Special order via supercheap. But surely someone else like BNT might have one in stock seeing as most mechanics need one.

Or......who are these guys??????
https://1-day.co.nz/s/54mm socket?sc=s

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, wheels said:

Is it a key way on the shaft?... But surely someone else like BNT might have one in stock seeing as most mechanics need one.

Or......who are these guys??????
https://1-day.co.nz/s/54mm socket?sc=s

 

Yeah, its keyed, no locking tab that I can see on it.

I've got a 3/4 bar so its just the socket I need - failing all else the engine is currently sitting on the trailer, so I'll haul its sorry ass off to a Yanmar place and pay them to remove the offending nut.

Thanks everyone for the very useful suggestions and help!

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1 hour ago, Tamure said:

ha! mental accounting can justify that- an engineer is 80 an hour!

yup - thats how I looked at it.

Plus I hate giving it to someone to do when I can do it myself.  These engines are so simple and easy to work on generally - there is no excuse for not doing it (especially when you did your time in the automotive industry).

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3 hours ago, harrytom said:

What are doing to the motor??rebuilding it.Thought you had just blown the exhaust??

Exhaust was blown - thats off having a stainless build done.

Same trip the rear main oil seal cried enough and it dumped 500ml of engine oil into the bilges over about 3 hours, so its gearbag off, flywheel off, bearing seal carrier plate off, new $20 seal, assembly is the reverse of the above.

While out its got new internal anodes, a few new water hoses, new fuel lines, water pump checked (relatively new impeller in it anyway), oil and filter change, and if I have time it will get a coat of hammerite or something similar.

Also bunging a lifting diode into the alternator to prop up the charging voltage 0.7v.

The actual motor is sound - good compressions and no bearing float (axial or radial) anywhere important.  Same with the gearbag. 

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one of these things is not like the other, one of these things is not quite the same...

On the right, the seal as specified in the manual and purchased prior to disassembly (generic 65-88-9)

On the left, the part that was removed and is around 5mm smaller in diameter.

On a  saturday, with all engineering supply shops closed.

Good day for drinking, and I'm on the wagon.

FFS.

 

IMG_20210407_072133_1.jpg

IMG_20210410_122642.jpg

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For anyone following this in years to come, the rear main seal for our 2QM20(H) is actually 60-82-8 dimensions, and the SKF part number is 23445.  Original part is NOK AH3220F, but this has been superceded.

It looks like Yanmar had a series of different specs over time for this engine.  Be warned!

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Buttoned up, ready to go back in.  New exhaust mixer fitted a few new water hoses, new fuel lines new oil and filter, new rear main oil seal, internal anodes replaced, manual crank starter removed because only part of it was there anyway, some bolts and nuts replaced.

Didn't get to the alternator step up, next time.

The timber on the front where the manual start used ot be is to mount the intake water screen to because I had to cut of the one that was fitted to the side of the engine bay to get engine out...

IMG_20210412_103414.jpg

IMG_20210412_103421.jpg

IMG_20210412_103433_1.jpg

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