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Famous schooner Nina


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The 1928 Starling Burgess schooner Nina is overdue from Opua to Newcastle Australia and is being discussed on a few other forums after relatives became worried.

 

http://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/About-us/ ... cident.asp

Friday 14 June

 

Enquiries were made following receipt of an email expressing concern for the classic 1928 staysail schooner Nina with a crew of seven travelling from Opua to Newcastle, Australia that may have be overdue. Extensive enquiries were made and it was thought that bad weather and the yacht's position on 4 June that had delayed her arrival time for Newcastle.

 

 

I just read this morning that ' The New Zealand authorities have instituted an aerial search for Nina."

Anyone heard anything about that?

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Met Rosemary before we left for Bundy last year. Made us a great cheese cake for the trip which I managed to devour as the other two were not feeling the best for the first couple of days.

Great old boat with a lot of history "became famous in the 1928 race from New York to Santander, Spain, for which she was expressly built. She won the 3900 mile race in 24 days and was greeted by King Alfonso from his launch"

 

http://www.classicyacht.info/modules/yachts/Ninita-TClass-yachts_detail-1587.html

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This has popped up on the CF site , I don't know how they get that , whether its an email or public info.

 

Subject: RCC0401/13 SAR SITREP 2

 

TRANSMISSION: URGENCY

 

 

DATE AND TIME (UTC) 251900 UTC JUN 2013

 

 

 

FROM: RESCUE COORDINATION CENTRE NEW ZEALAND

 

 

 

TO: HEADQUARTERS JOINT FORCES NEW ZEALAND, RCCNZ DUTY MANAGER, MNZ MEDIA

 

 

 

INFO: AUMCC, FRIENDS AND FAMILY CONTACTS

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

SAR SITREP (NUMBER): TWO

 

 

 

(A) IDENTITY OF VESSEL: SV NINA

 

 

 

(B) POSITION: LAST KNOWN POSITION 33 53 S 165 18 E AT 032330 UTC JUN 13

 

 

 

© SITUATION: SV NINA WITH 7 POB DEPARTED OPUA NEW ZEALAND 29 MAY 2013 BOUND FOR NEWCASTLE, AUSTRALIA. LAST CONTACT WITH VESSEL WAS 032350 UTC JUN 13. AT THAT TIME THEY WERE IN CENTRE OF LOW AND WERE ADVISED BY WEATHER FORECASTER TO HEAD SOUTH AND HEAVE TO UNTIL SWELL ABATED.

 

NO TRANSMISSION FROM SATELLITE PHONE OR SPOT DEVICE ON BOARD SINCE CONTACT ABOVE. SKIPPER DAVID DYCHE BELIEVED TO HAVE ESTIMATED ARRIVAL AT NEWCASTLE 08 JUNE BUT UNREALISTIC GIVEN POSITION ON 04 JUNE SHOWS 250 NM PROGRESS SINCE DEPARTURE FROM OPUA. SV NINA IS A CLASSIC RACING SCHOONER BUT HAS REPORTED POOR PERFORMANCE HEAD TO WIND. CUMMINGS 150 HP ENGINE INSTALLED IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO DEPARTURE.

 

 

 

(D) NUMBER OF PERSONS: SEVEN

 

 

 

(E) ASSISTANCE REQUIRED: RCC AUSTRALIA REQUESTED TO CONTINUE INVESTIGATIONS THROUGH CUSTOMS AND OTHER MEANS AS DEEMED APPROPRIATE.

 

 

(F) CO-ORDINATING RCC: RESCUE COORDINATION CENTRE NEW ZEALAND

 

 

 

(G) DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL: 59-FT SCHOONER (70-FT INCLUDING BOWSPRIT) CONSTRUCTED IN 1928 OF WOOD AND USA-REGISTERED. WHITE TOPSIDES, GREEN HULL AND TAN MASTS. SHE HAS ONE 8-PERSON LIFE RAFT, PARACHUTE FLARES, VHF RADIO AND EPIRB.

 

 

 

(J) INITIAL ACTIONS TAKEN: COMMUNICATION SEARCH COMMENCED 14 JUNE AND CONTINUING. AERIAL SEARCH CONDUCTED 25 JUNE BY RNZAF P3 ORION. SEARCH AREA BASED ON POSSIBILITY THAT WEATHER AND SEA CONDITIONS CAUSED SV NINA TO BECOME DISABLED AND ADRIFT AT LAST KNOWN POSITION. 96 PERCENT OF 168 000 SQUARE NM SEARCH AREA COMPLETED. MANY YACHTS LOCATED BUT SV NINA NOT LOCATED. NO VESSELS REPORTED ANY SIGHTINGS OF SV NINA.

 

 

(K) SEARCH AREA: AERIAL SEARCH PLANNED FOR 26 JUNE BY RNZAF P3 ORION BASED ON VESSEL CONTINUING FROM LAST KNOWN POSITION TOWARD INTENDED DESTINATION. SEARCH AREA COVERS 320 000 SQUARE NM IN THE TASMAN SEA BETWEEN NORTHERN NEW ZEALAND AND AUSTRALIAN COAST.

 

 

 

 

 

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This is knot looking good. She is solidly built but knot high sided, I hope she hasn't been swamped. Mind you she and the base crew on her has done a lot of sea miles so they could just be drifting unmasted. Being low wooded she could be hard to see.

 

Fingers crossed they are all OK drifting towards land somewhere. But it's knot good there has been zero contact or electronic transmissions.

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Was just on the news and not looking good

Cheers KM it was that indeed, i remember the limes now

Great old lady owned by a lovely lady, here's hoping

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From Stuff.co.nz:

 

He said the estimate of a 12-day trip was "very ambitious" given the weather conditions, especially given they had been asked to wait out the storm.

 

 

So I wonder who asked them?

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And where/when? Was it before they cleared North Cape, or before they left. It had crossed my mind as to why you would leave then, with a large, well forecast storm brewing in the Tasman :shock: . It's a place to be respected....

I really hope it turns out OK, but to be realistic it does not look to hopeful. :cry:

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7 lost at sea

 

 

5:30 AM Friday Jun 28, 2013

 

 

 

A New Zealand meteorologist took the last known calls from seven people aboard a classic American racing yacht missing in the Tasman: "The weather's turned nasty, how do we get away from it?"

 

 

The phone calls and texts suddenly stopped on June 4. More than three weeks later, searchers say they have grave concerns for the crew on the 84-year-old wooden vessel that went missing while sailing from New Zealand to Australia. Attempts to contact the crew by radio and an intensive Air Force aerial search this week have proved fruitless.

 

David Dyche 58, his wife Rosemary, 60, and their 17-year-old son, also named David, left the Bay of Islands aboard their 21m schooner Nina on May 29. They were heading for Newcastle, Australia, with a 35-year-old British man and three other Americans - a woman, 18, a man, 28 and Evi Nemeth, 73.

 

Meteorologist Bob McDavitt said he took a satellite phone call from Ms Nemeth on June 3. She asked how to get away from the weather.

 

He said to call back in 30 minutes after he'd studied a forecast. She did.

 

"She was quite controlled in her voice, it sounded like everything was under control," Mr McDavitt said.

 

Mr McDavitt said he spoke only briefly to Ms Nemeth, advising her to head south and to brace for a storm with strong winds and high seas.

 

The next day he got a text, the last known communication from the boat: "ANY UPDATE 4 NINA? ... EVI"

 

McDavitt said he advised the crew to stay put and ride out the storm another day. He continued sending messages over the next few days but received no answer.

 

Friends of the crew got in touch with McDavitt soon after that, and then alerted authorities on June 14.

 

Mr Dyche, an experienced commercial captain, planned to arrive in Australia by June 8.

Maritime New Zealand said the last-known location for the Nina was about 685km north-west of Cape Reinga.

 

Rescue Co-ordination Centre coordinator Kevin Banaghan said the centre held "grave concerns for the Nina and her crew, but remains hopeful of a positive outcome".

 

"Our records show that conditions at the last known position for the vessel were very rough, with winds of 80km/h, gusting to 110km/h, and swells of up to 8m."

 

He said several things could have happened, including the boat losing communications or drifting off course, or the crew taking to lifeboats. The boat could have suffered a catastrophic failure and sank before anybody had time to react.

 

Evi Nemeth is known in technology circles as the matriarch of system administration and technology infrastructure measurement.

 

She has been named as one of the "top 25 women on the web".

 

Nina was built in 1928 for a race from New York to Spain, which it won. It then went on to win many other races around the world.

 

Mr Dyche bought the Nina in 1988 and set sail with his wife and son in 2008. His wife wrote in a blog that their dream as a family was to circumnavigate the world, "meet people, learn about their culture and see the beauty of the world".

 

Their journey took them through the Bahamas, South America and French Polynesia.

They arrived in New Zealand in December 2011, and spent about a year moored in Whangarei, thrilling locals when they decorated the Nina last Christmas.

 

http://www..nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/arti ... d=10893482

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It's knot looking promising but then she is a solid boat or at least the hull is so you just never know. We did have a Tri drifting knot far off our cost for many months totally unseen.

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It's knot looking promising but then she is a solid boat or at least the hull is so you just never know. We did have a Tri drifting knot far off our cost for many months totally unseen.

 

I doubt if it was a solid boat. Search and rescue say they lost communication suddenly. Also stated could have suffered Catastrophic failer. Why make such a comment? because Wood glues only have approx 30 year life spans and the whole vessels stringers ect have to be re nogged. Like Wispers of Wellington the new owner found. If not re nogged the boat would be only holding together like a new jig saw puzzel waiting for a slam dunk from a wave. The positions puts them north of 3 kings Is and to west ward at 170 deg east long 33 deg south with the storm center in the tasman sea level with nelson approx. The storm was approaching from the south with the center slamming Wellington. The top of the Isobars [ Depression] where not that far north from three kings - sea only 8 Meters. I would have thought sailing on a northerly course would have been the correct thing to do. So i guess the paper article quoting Mc Davitt that they should head south, slam dunking into head seas must be a miss print. That would lead to the Catastrophic letting go of all the glue joints simultaneously the entire bow to midships in my opinion and a naval architect from the Cook Islands.

Another case for N.Z. to have DSC.

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And where/when? Was it before they cleared North Cape, or before they left. It had crossed my mind as to why you would leave then, with a large, well forecast storm brewing in the Tasman :shock: . It's a place to be respected....

I really hope it turns out OK, but to be realistic it does not look to hopeful. :cry:

 

Could not have been that bad the Auckland fIji RACE WAS GIVEN THE LIGHT with a small boat entry.

 

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=22158&start=60

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