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Hi looking for some comment regarding comparison between Alan Wrights Shiraz and Lotus 10.6 thanks. It would seem the Shiraz is a better sailing boat and perhaps more suitable offshore ?

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I recall Shiraz was designed first, Lotus 10.6 a couple of years later.

Lotus is a bigger volume boat with a wider stern, Shiraz would be a little better balanced.

Mk 11 Lotus has the convenience of a walk thru stern

Shiraz has a masthead rig with some set up as cutters, Lotus has a slightly unusual fractional rig with in line spreaders and just the top mast back stay keeping the forestay tight and the mast in the boat.

Both have done lots of offshore miles

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I was told the lotus 10.6 can be a handful in stronger winds due to width at back?? And that the Shiraz is likely to perform better upwind?

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I have never sailed a Shiraz though I always thought they looked like a reasonable cruising boat.

I have sailed a Lotus 10.6 offshore including an extended period on the wind in breezes up to force 7 (as is quite common on a return from the Pacific Islands).  It was not a happy experience though in large part this was due to the owner's incomplete preparation of the boat rather than a fundamental problem with the design.

The cockpit was not conducive to comfort and easy working when sailing to windward for an extended period with a decent sea running.  None of this was insurmountable with a little modification.  With boats that are broad across the cockpit I have a preference for well placed braces for feet, well thought-out anchor points for harnesses, and a layout that allows a crew to work the boat when heeled without expending unnecessary effort to keep themselves in the right place or at the right angle to winches, clutches etc.  The Lotus 10.6 cockpit (at least the one I sailed) is great for cocktails in a quiet bay, but not so great for 48 hours on the wind in a seaway.  But then I have been spoiled and lucky to sail on boats that have been very well thought-out for offshore racing and passages, both on deck and below.  

I have a dislike for large cabin windows offshore, and for large volume cockpits that are not set up for rapid draining at any angle of heel.  I also don't like cabins without thought put into how far the crew below may fall in a knockdown, or just while moving through the cabin in a big sea, and how to reduce risks associated with that.  The Lotus 10.6 suffered on all counts, but again this could be remedied if an owner planned regular offshore work.  Other problems we had (leaky foredeck hatch, broken halyards, unsecure storage below) were nothing to do with the boat and all about preparation.  We also had difficulty removing such water as we had below - primarily as a result of a leaking forward hatch.  The result was water up the interior of the boat which, when heeled for extended periods, soaked the contents in lockers - in conditions which, while feisty, were quite common and not at all dangerous.  Again this can be rectified with some work on the interior and sensible bilge pump installation - and may not be a problem at all in other boats of this design.  The boat I sailed was finished by the owner who was neither a boat builder nor experienced offshore.

I came away from that trip thinking that the Lotus 10.6 was a fine boat for the Gulf, but would not be my choice for offshore.  That said, we did enjoy some very pleasant reaching.

I'm not saying that the design should not be taken offshore.  What Kerry Dobbs achieved in Kirsten J (the smaller Lotus 9.2, which is very similar in concept) is legendary.

 

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As per Muzza.

The Lotus 10.6 is a great coastal cruising boat than can happily get up to the islands with care. Phil Plimmer  - Different Drummer (sp?) has done 1000's of Pacific miles on a 10.6. The Shiraz is an excellent traditionally based yacht that gives you the timeless and easy ride of a well built wooden boat.

My Dad sailed a lot on Syrah when it was in Wellington before it went off cruising. It was a good racer cruiser back in the day but regarded solely as a cruiser now. They won the Cook Strait race one year as a low rater coming home on the sea breeze.

 

 

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Regarding the 9.2 Lotus, the cockpit is a lot narrower than the 10.6 and allows for you to brace your legs against the leward cockpit sets. Not that much slower upwind than a 10.6.

What about a Davidson 35?

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Nothing wrong with a custom build, our 1991 lidgard 35 is strip plank cedar epoxy, built tough, sails well on all points of sail, 360 litres water 200 diesel, roomy interior,  open transom wheel steer, also motors well with a 3ym30 Yanmar, fits a 35 ft berth in HMB, there are a lot of good boats that aren’t glass production jobs, also no osmosis worries

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Yes I used to own White Pointer’s sister ship “Aily’s Comet” (now “C McGuire” - go figure?!). Same size and cedar core glasses construction but slightly more cruising oriented with masthead rig not fractional. Was an amazing cruising boat for me for 15yrs and I did some crazy things in AC but she looked after me and my family & friends incredibly. I never raced seriously but in the odd cruising race we left any of the Lotuses for dead (9.2 / 9.5 / 10.6) and we used to keep the Farr 1020s and 1106s honest.

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