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Restoring aluminium finish - paint or powder coating?


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At the moment I am replacing the bearings in our steering pedestal and I'm thinking that while it's off I would restore the finish on the aluminium pedestal itself. The surface has had plenty of dings over its life, it's looking tired and there is some surface corrosion around some of the fittings. I'd like it to look good and most importantly to last as I intend to have this boat for a long time.

 

So the question is should I just get it repainted or should I get it powder coated? Any thoughts or preferences out there? 

 

Excuse the greasy mess but here is the item in question:

 

Capture.JPG

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There is a business in gabador place just before Mc Mullen and wing that strips old paint and powder coating in preparation for new. They have a specialty in stripping alloy. Pretty good . I don't think you'll be able to get that anodised .

 I bet you're in for some surprises when its stripped, you can't fair with filler for powdercoating( or have any old paint  left whatsoever) , but you can for paint.

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One thing to note with anodizing is damage is a bit harder to cover up, Any bumps and scrapes will go through the thin anodized layer and if colored will be a real PITA to fix up

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Also the anodising process starts with a very aggressive etching and it could destroy fine details. I just tried to anodise my gear selector lever today, finally I dropped of to the powder coating place. It has a shorter lifespan, but no risk to damage it. 

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Went down this path a few years ago, went with a painted finish.  Done by a crowd in Patiki Road, they did a good job and baked it a little.  Took my time getting the fastening bolts right - as in not cracking the paint - and it is still looking 100%.

 

Got steered away from powder coating as once the coverage is compromised and water gets under the coating, its all over.  With paint you have a chance to sand it back and patch if required.   Obviously no coating on alloy is for ever...

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The paint I used on my alloy mast has had a few people thinking it was powered coated. It's a 2 pot highish build, epoxy based so no need for a etch primer. Flows out a treat.

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The paint I used on my alloy mast has had a few people thinking it was powered coated. It's a 2 pot highish build, epoxy based so no need for a etch primer. Flows out a treat.

...and the name of this liquid gold would be?

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Tuff Coat 2K ......... something or other :)

 

I knew I should have checked, will do when I get home.

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That went on top, underneath is the epoxy version. I didn't need to put the Urethane on top but I had some left in the gun so blew a lite one over the epoxy just to use it up. That also unified the low sheen finish boat wide.

 

I was told by 3 independent places 2 pot epoxies don't need etch priming first. I was asking about alloy mast and don't know if that theory applies to other metals. I do hope they are right.

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Correct KM.

 

Modern epoxies dont need etch (in fact they preffer not to have it as they are designed to stick to bare metal/alloy)

Resenes Industrial 440 is magic but does require top coating. If you go with a "standard" 2K finish from automotive sector you will save youself a heap of dramas.

Dont go to hard topcoats as they will chip too easily and are not easy to "touch up". This way, if you have any dramas in the future it can be fixed without beeing a major.

 

If you get stuck give me a call on 0274 960 649

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a good tough industrial quality paint will generally stand up better than powder coating. Powder coating will chip quite easily. Have heard of folk having success with Carboline Alkyd road paint, extremely tough and not expensive.

Alloy prefers not to be coated with anything, it creates its own protective layer.

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