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Curran Street Wreck


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He's right about one thing. The Harbour Master should be boarding yachts to see if they are attached safely to the mooring. 3 out of 4 boats I see washed up have had mooring cleats ripped from the deck.

 oh you're a funny man.  If that happened, the first time a boat owner was told they need to repair, upgrade or fix something the HM would be getting told to F off its my boat and what do you know about it anyway....

 

You may have missed the point that most of the yachties on here aren't particularly in favour of being told what to do...

 

surly there is a degree of owner responsibility and self interest in making sure everything is in good nick and up  to the job?

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 oh you're a funny man.  If that happened, the first time a boat owner was told they need to repair, upgrade or fix something the HM would be getting told to F off its my boat and what do you know about it anyway....

 

You may have missed the point that most of the yachties on here aren't particularly in favour of being told what to do...

 

surly there is a degree of owner responsibility and self interest in making sure everything is in good nick and up  to the job?

If you re-read your post I think you'll find that your first and last statements are in direct conflict with each other.  It's the arseholes who would tell the HM to Foff that have no "owner responsibility and self interest in making sure everything is in good nick and up  to the job"!

And yet they're the ones that we all fear.  There's a big boat north of my mooring the worries me.  I'll be on the HM's case when my boat is back on.

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I disagree Grant. Idiots who let their boats plough through a mooring put my boat at risk, not to mention my rates that go for cleanup and oil spills. I really don't care if idiots don't like being told what to do. That's what laws are for. No offence and I'm not calling you or anyone here an idiot.

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We've got enough people telling us what to do  and I bet there would be laws that would prevent the Harbour master climbing on boats uninvited. 

If you were concerned about a boat you saw was a danger to yours  then the logical step would be to talk to the Harbour master then , if he has a complaint/ concern registered then he could investigate. I did that in 19 eighty something about a wreck and it was dealt with.

 What went on that boat anyway? When I had a vested interest ( a boat on an exposed mooring) and monitored all the boats going up in Okahu and Hobson bay it was inevitably chafe on the bow strop that caused the problem. That or the swivel.

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Actually the HM already has the authority to remove any vessel they deem a danger:

 

48 Removal of Vessels

Where a vessel breaks free from or drags its mooring, or causes an obstruction or is

endangering another vessel or causing or resulting in a navigational safety issue or is sinking or
has become unseaworthy, the Harbourmaster may remove or secure that vessel at the owner's
risk.
 
My dealings with the HM office has always been brilliant.  I believe that they would act in a fair manner with a boat owner, give them a fair time to resolve the issue and then act if necessary.  Their actions toward this wreck's owner is very fair I think.
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If you expect the HM to hop on every boat and conduct a survey of all it's mooring and related equipment you're simply deluded. For a start they aren't qualified to do that even if they had the time, the gear, the budget and the desire to be called nosy A holes by the 1000's of boat owners who never had had nor never will have a issue.

 

One dude who didn't use simple common sense a problem does not make.

 

 

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Agreed - it is a very small issue with probably only a few boats.  However if you were genuinely concerned about a vessel putting yours in danger, took photos etc and contacted them directly then I suggest they would hop on.  A HM vessel passes by almost every mooring site almost every day.

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If you re-read your post I think you'll find that your first and last statements are in direct conflict with each other.  It's the arseholes who would tell the HM to Foff that have no "owner responsibility and self interest in making sure everything is in good nick and up  to the job"!

And yet they're the ones that we all fear.  There's a big boat north of my mooring the worries me.  I'll be on the HM's case when my boat is back on.

possibly, I also read a lot of posts on here that believe "somebody should do something" unless they  are the somebody that is being told in which case the other party is interfering no-nothing that should go away

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Actually the HM already has the authority to remove any vessel they deem a danger:

 

48 Removal of Vessels

Where a vessel breaks free from or drags its mooring, or causes an obstruction or is

endangering another vessel or causing or resulting in a navigational safety issue or is sinking or
has become unseaworthy, the Harbourmaster may remove or secure that vessel at the owner's
risk.
 
My dealings with the HM office has always been brilliant.  I believe that they would act in a fair manner with a boat owner, give them a fair time to resolve the issue and then act if necessary.  Their actions toward this wreck's owner is very fair I think.

 

correct, and they do that in relation to abandoned boats as well, and as was stated follow up on concerns reported to them.  That is quite different from actively inspecting all the boats as was suggested.

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and to put it into context this sort of stuff is my day job, 

 

I was just amused at the post that shifted my role from the "know nothing interfering bureaucrat" to"useful person to fix the problem" 

 

in relation to moorings we recently had a diver have a quick swim through one of our mooring areas (we have a few less than up your way...) and that definitely prevented one yacht going on the bricks and has hastened work on a couple more moorings to ensure they stayed in one piece.  These were moorings that the owners were playing by the rules and generally taking care of as well

.

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Agreed - it is a very small issue with probably only a few boats.  However if you were genuinely concerned about a vessel putting yours in danger, took photos etc and contacted them directly then I suggest they would hop on.  A HM vessel passes by almost every mooring site almost every day.

Absolutely. The HM office doesn't want any numpty buggering their day any more then you or I do.

 

But they are more limited in what actions they can take than most people would think. Also they have processes they must follow which often means delays and frustration. They get just as frustrated as we do often.

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If you expect the HM to hop on every boat and conduct a survey of all it's mooring and related equipment you're simply deluded. For a start they aren't qualified to do that even if they had the time, the gear, the budget and the desire to be called nosy A holes by the 1000's of boat owners who never had had nor never will have a issue.

 

One dude who didn't use simple common sense a problem does not make.

yep!

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We recently managed to convince the Harbour Master to get our Neighbour removed at Northcote Point, so the process can work. What we did to get some action:

  • Emailed the HM photos of the badly run down boat. They reply saying they will check.
  • 6 months later, repeat with updated photos. 
  • 6 months later repeat with updated photos
  • Get other neighbouring mooring owners to email the harbour master too.
  • Find the mooring chain about to wear through, send email to harbour master with photos. Get other mooring owners to voice their concern.

This finally prompted some action and the harbour master served a notice to remove the vessel within 10 days.

 

The boat was then auctioned on Trademe. I'm not sure if it was the Harbour Master or the Owner.

 

Given that it is nearly impossible to insure a boat on a mooring, I think that is an indicator that something needs to change on how moorings are managed.

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We have a major problem in this country already with too many rules ans laws etc and they mostly come about due to some idiot that has had something happen due to his own negligence and then cries that someone else should be responsible to cover him being an idiot.
Can you also imagine the cost imposed on mooring holders if the HM was to spend so much time inspecting moorings.
By the way, Down here in the Sounds, all moorings must be lifted and inspected every two years instead of the normal three. Just an added expense and unnecessary.

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Thanks Freeeeedommmmm

What HM?

I've notified Auckland HM about abandoned moorings covered in mussels floating just below the waterline - a definite hazard! AFAIK they are still there a year later.

 

In Okauhu Bay and Hobson Bay I estimate 10 boats a year wash up on the shoreline. The time and effort cleaning that up is probably more than telling owners that they have to secure their boats properly to the mooring and doing the odd inspection. It's a bit dumb having mooring rules and no rules about cleats etc attaching your pile of $%$ to the mooring.

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Many of those boats that come lose and go ashore are often "given up on" and i think those owners purposely let the boats mooring lines become worn, just to get rid of the Boat. Those are the Boats you see with the Mussel Farm on the Hull. Never been off the mooring in years. The HM Boat does take a general tour around the moorings every now and then. It's really obvious to see these forgotten Boats and I don't know why the HB office does not get harder on those owners. That's a lot different than inspecting every boat on a mooring and would get rid a lot of threats to the good owners boats.

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The problem is you can't dispose of a boat that is stuffed. Ifa boat is "at the end of its economic life" what can you do?

Take it out the back of Rangitoto and sink it?

 

Selling it is pointless and doesn't work, it just shifts a stuffed wreck onto someone else, as is the topic case in-point.

 

The behaviors that occurs, is complete sh*t boxes are abandoned on moorings and left to break free and get wrecked in a storm. Then the HM cleans up and problem is gone.

 

There are car wreckers, but no boat wreckers (KM excluded, he says he's "rebuilding" his)

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