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Forgetting whether you agree with it or not, one huge difference between 1 super yacht coming in & spending 3 million dollars, and 300 small yachts coming in & spending $10,000 each to reach the same 3 mill spend, is it takes very little cost, manpower or resource to safely get a superyacht in & quarantined safely. And like the film industry, the superyacht picks up the bill. 

Same as getting 250 overseas film crew in, Directors, Producers, Actors etc. who enable projects that employ thousands of Kiwis, & kickstart 1.5 billion in film projects.   

Vs 250 fruit pickers, who generate a few thousand apples?

If you want to say 1 rule for all, then no-one comes in, and we kill a whole lot more businesses.

Even crayon eaters like our present Govt. aren't that stupid. Thanks god. 

Anchoring several hundred yachts in a bay for quarantine is easy if you say it fast. Doing it & ensuring the security of the border isn't quite so simple.

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I don't see how they would be 'stuck' in Tahiti? With a Carte de Seyjour, they could easily sail to Nuka Hiva or sail to the eastern Tuamotu for hurricane season, or even Hawaii to the north. The

Well yes there sort of is rational and sort of a sh*t load of it. As noted they did ask to come and were told No so what did they do, they thought f*ck you new Zealand, f*ck your laws, f*ck the r

They want to come to NZ not because their son died, not because of weather problems, but because their broker says the yacht will sell more easily here. They left and buried their son in the uk,

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As long as we can quarantine people effectively then I'm all for opening borders, but it seems that the risk is way too high to let em all in on planes and cruise liners then trust their honesty.

Private boats are unique, generally if they can prove their passage time and enter quarantine station for say, 21 days? including passage time then why not let them in. Make an area in the BOI or indeed behind Browns....

to add in reference to BK's comment above; you can only manage so many in quarantine, it may not be hundreds but a few dozen.

 

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I read a post from Lin Pardey yesterday saying that kiwi cruisers returning to NZ can quarantine on their boat as long as their passage is 11 days or more. 

This could easily be applied to foreign cruisers. No sweat no hassle.

She said she would have slowed down had she known as she has just completed four days government quarantine.

 

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19 hours ago, Island Time said:

Totally different argument, sorry. General tourists (by plane) pose a huge and difficult to control (expensive to quarantine) risk to NZ

What's the difference between a hotel with some 100's of covid possibles in it and 600 + cruisers who are also possibles?

The hotel has them all contained in one place easy to watch and control compliance. 100 boats scattered around are just as controllable and containable?

As we have seen a few in the hotels are more than willing to ignore laws and direction but then so have a few cruisers.

People in the hotels pay (or so the Govt likes to say yet f*ck all actually have been charged by the looks of it), cruisers won't.

If someone in a hotel comes down with covid they are easily dealt to, if someone anchored does they aren't.

If there is an 'event' in a hotel responders have PPE systems etc on hand. Does Coastguard and responders to a cruiser in the pooh have the same protections?

And consider this. If 300 cruisers arrived that would mean 4 times the number of people currently quarantined in Wellington, 3 times the number currently in Hamo, twice the total number locked down in  Rotovagas, the same as the total number locked down in Chch or increase the total in Auckland by over 10%. The number of cruisers being talked about contain a very significant number of people in relation to the total number our border people are currently dealing with.

Economics? Depends whose in the hotels as to who is the better risk to accept.

Again if the argument is economic the cruisers are still way down the list. If it is acceptable for a 40fter to spend 10 days at sea then anchor for 4 then surely the same applies to any vessel. So if the border can only be opened to a 'set number' of boats/people do we take 40fters or 700fters?

To match ONLY 10% the spend of the ships, which do spread that spend very widely around, each of the 300 cruisers would need to spend $190,000 each. For the 300 cruisers to match the average spend of 1 superboat having a  decent refit they would need to spend $50,000 each. And we can have that superboat without the significant number of people risks the cruisers come with.

The ONLY argument to let the cruisers in is on some form of 'hugs n kisses' angle. If that is the criteria then surely there are others in far more need.

 

 

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I've just had a interesting chat with a Cruiser up in the Islands who is packing up his craft ready to voyage to NZ, he said he's got 2 weeks before he can leave. He reckons the word he has been told is 'get ready'.

A very interesting but not unexpected twist, should he be right of course.....and I have zero idea if he is or not.

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Seems a rather callous and disrespectfull way of describing an article on a family who recently lost a child.

I have relatives who lost their kid in a tragic accident a few years back. Something you never get over.

This family just want to come to NZ, sell their boat and go home to the UK to try and rebuild their lives.

"Every time I go out in the cockpit and look over I remember the scene, seeing my son floating in the water unconscious and probably dead by that time, being dragged by a woman who recovered him."

Not sure how that doesn't tick the humanitarian box.

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Apparently the average spend of these cruisers is 50k. 400 x 50k is $20 million. Thats a lot of dosh that would be much appreciated by our marine industry.

“We just can’t get our heads around why they're not letting the cruising boats in, to be honest. There are 400 boats - it's a hell of a lot of boats and a hell of a lot of money,” business owner Peter Boyd said.

Far North Holdings says isolation requirements are not difficult.

“The procedures we'd like to see in place are that they travel and isolate for their full 14 days," he said. "We have a testing station established here at the marina so they can undertake negative tests before they depart." 

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/marine-industry-lobbying-government-allow-international-boaties-stranded-in-pacific-into-nz-waters

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17 minutes ago, Sabre said:

Seems a rather callous and disrespectfull way of describing an article on a family who recently lost a child.

I have relatives who lost their kid in a tragic accident a few years back. Something you never get over.

This family just want to come to NZ, sell their boat and go home to the UK to try and rebuild their lives.

"Every time I go out in the cockpit and look over I remember the scene, seeing my son floating in the water unconscious and probably dead by that time, being dragged by a woman who recovered him."

Not sure how that doesn't tick the humanitarian box.

They want to come to NZ not because their son died, not because of weather problems, but because their broker says the yacht will sell more easily here.

They left and buried their son in the uk, then returned to the yacht.  Get that - they CHOSE to return to the yacht, recently.  They have a range of options avaialble to them before that. 

They could have stayed in the UK in August when they already should have known the position of the NZ govt on cruising yachts entering NZ.

Having chosen to return to the yacht, they could stay where they are and sell there, or appoint an agent to care for the yacht while they sort their sh*t out.

Its pretty clear they are making financial decisions here, not humanitarian ones.

Thousands of people daily have relatives die in-situ.  They don't all suddenly claim that they have to get out of Dodge, and sell their assets in the best market available globally so they can "move on".

The article is an emotive and manipulative piece of trash journalism.  Even the headline is deceiving and a distortion of the facts.

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