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Having always worked in the Auckland based marine industry, I wish to refute Foggs claims but find that I can not. In fact personal experience backs them up, and further to that having worked for some of these larger operators I am shocked how little time or effort was put into technical or on the job training, these are the same ones (people) working on the superyachts, luckily many of the superyacht 'engineers' these days only seem to know how to pick up a phone. Back when I started all marine companies-be they chandlers sailmakers riggers engineers had a system of putting the newbies under the wing of an experienced hand, a sort of pastoral care if you like, this had two benefits - training on the job and avoiding cock ups for the company. It seems this approach has been thrown out of late and first week employees are being sent to multi million dollar vessels to guess their way through jobs, whilst being billed out as top barristers! 

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10 minutes ago, waikiore said:

Back when I started all marine companies-be they chandlers sailmakers riggers engineers had a system of putting the newbies under the wing of an experienced hand, a sort of pastoral care if you like, this had two benefits - training on the job and avoiding cock ups for the company.  

That was the long proven way of training young people for a profession or trade right back to the time of druids and witch doctors 😁. Remember the old 8,000-9,000hr apprenticeship system where at the end of their time a boatbuilder could build a boat from lofting to final fitout and similarly for a chippy to almost build a complete house (except for brickwork/roofing/electrics and plumbing).

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The term 'Apprenticeship" seems to have fallen out of fashion. But whatever they want to call it they should be following the practice. It's only common sense (another lost concept). And in reality many other industries are still operating this hierarchical (oops - another dirty word) model to train newcomers and avoid screw-ups. Even if they don't call it an apprenticeship. And I'm grateful such a model exists. It makes me feel better when I talk to people about something important e.g. a doctor or a lawyer or a car mechanic.

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1 hour ago, waikiore said:

a system of putting the newbies under the wing of an experienced hand, a sort of pastoral care if you like, this had two benefits - training on the job and avoiding cock ups for the company.

Our eldest is nearing the end of his apprenticeship (Electrical) and this is how he's spent most of his time and it shows - I was quietly impressed when he habitually pulled out a small bubble stick to verify a light switch he had just reinstalled was plumb after checking something minor at home.

I think the issue might be challenged by the attitude and work ethic he's described of some of his peers. That and the fact that the older hand has limited means to correct said attitude and behaviour. I couldn't handle 8 hours with a feckless handbrake 5 days a week...

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