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Looking for recommendations for a 30 - 40 ft liveaboard keeler


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2 hours ago, CarpeDiem said:

Interestingly they list that 3rd party only is available for ferro boats only.

I guess GRP and timber boats are at higher risk of sinking from low maintenance than ferro...? 

It still makes no sense to me.. guess that's why I am not in the insurance industry. 

 

Nope. Ferro they will not do comprehensive. “Third party only”

All other they will do 3rd party only.

What Barbara told me anyway. Less I’m losing my hard drive.

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27 minutes ago, Tamaterau said:

Just looked at the add for the Matangi looks ideal for what you want but an alloy top on a steel hull sounds like a recipe for issues… effectively you could be sailing a battery right?

at least the lights won't go out...

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8 minutes ago, Black Panther said:

It's been done, add a rain catchment system and all good

I reckon a small 12v water maker would be the go on a small liveabord with a decent solar array. Might not be able to provide an adequate supply indefinitely, but would certainly extend your cruising range.

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2 minutes ago, Vin said:

I reckon a small 12v water maker would be the go on a small liveabord with a decent solar array. Might not be able to provide an adequate supply indefinitely, but would certainly extend your cruising range.

Wait until you see the price of a small 12v water maker...

Will make jerry cans look extremely attractive.

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4 minutes ago, khayyam said:

~$6k?

In that order, I was thinking $7k. 

Note  I don't have one (can't afford it). If your initial capital budget is $10k - $20k for the boat, as per the OP, then I think a water maker may be bit hopeful. (tell 'em he's dreamin)

PS, that is excluding the extra solar and / or generator to run it And batteries to store all of that solar. And most likely an inverter because, if I'm correct, 12v systems need far too high a current to the pump to create the pressure required to run an RO unit effectively.

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3 hours ago, Black Panther said:

A bit of unsolicited advice. Whatever you buy don't add or change anything for the first 12 months of living aboard.

^^This absolutely!

3 hours ago, Fish said:

Wait until you see the price of a small 12v water maker...

Will make jerry cans look extremely attractive.

What a few cruisers do is dam the deck around the filler after a few minutes of rain or direct a scupper into a container

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Time to add my 2 cents worth.
Everyone has provided great info by the way.
However, from a low income Boat owner, now to a non boat owner because the cost has gone out of reach, here is my view.
Firstly, everything I add below is dependant on your idea of Cruising. If you want a Blue Water Boat to Cruise the World, Boat to Cruise NZ water, or a Boat that is mainly to live aboard and cruise the local area.
If the plan is to eventually cruise large distances, even if that is just NZ waters, then you need to start with a Boat closer to the $100K mark. Although you might get a bargain if you decide to take time and wait till something comes up. However, Boats in that $100K range are usually capable and ready to go. They have everything you need, although all gear onboard is getting older and nearing replacement, it's usable. Replacement will usually mean a new sail at some stage, maybe new instruments at some stage, new batteries at some stage, etc etc. The higher the price you pay, usual rule of thumb is that the gear is in better condition and a bit more up to date. .
So, If you have in your mind that a ready to go Cruiser is around the $100K mark, then as you come down in price, you need to think "I will have to spend the difference to bring it back to ready again". So if you pay $80K, you will likely spend $20K on it. If you pay just $20K, you need to spend $80K on it. That is just to get it ready for Coast water cruising. It is not including normal Maintenance.
     The problem is, if you don't have the ability to earn that extra amount of money, then you will be always in a perpetual struggle of "trying to afford" all the time. And you end up getting stuck in a box watching all that gear grow older and more tired around you. If you do get out there, then it is no more than simple Cruising around the Golf and such. And I say this because form my experience, NZ Coastal Waters are not to be under estimated. They are as challenging and dangerous as any Ocean Passage. In some areas of NZ are more so. You simply do not take them on unless you have a (well found) capable Boat.
Now in saying that, I know of people that have sailed NZ Coastal waters in H28's and the like with no problem at all. But they have experience and gear in capable condition.
Owning a Boat is expensive. I don't know why you only have $20K, and I don't need to know. Maybe living aboard will free up a larger income for you. Only you can and need to answer that. But the above gives you a better idea of the cost if you buy cheap now, you need to spend later. Or buy more expensive now and not have quite the same spend later. However, you will always have costs very similar to the cost of renting a Home just to keep a Boat in good condition in a Marina.
    I don't mean to sound so negative, but to add one more downer of a point, remember that a Boat is a depreciating asset. As it grows older, the value grows smaller. And you won't ever get back what you put into it.

 

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Totally agree Wheels, as soon as you buy a boat the clock is ticking because everything is still wearing out to some degree and definitely depreciating. However if its in basically good condition then its a matter of keeping on top of it, a battery, some lines, a sail, antifoul etc. The common idea that 10% of what its worth in good condition in maintenance costs is probably not too far away. Spend nothing for 5 years then suddenly you will need to spend 5 years worth on the rig or something.

There is a certain reality that as boats become less desirable they fall into lower price ranges and eventually get to a level where people can afford to buy them but not have the budget maintain them properly, eventually they end up being sold on for a while at that level until they die on a mooring or someone falls in love and spends a huge amount of time and money restoring it.

 

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Following on from Wheels and talk of costs...I bought a pocket cruiser for under $20K in 2016....two refits later (yes two not one) probably spent $200K on it over five years if I was to add everything up including haulage, hardstanding, marina berths, labour, materials, equipment etc etc etc .  I stopped counting long ago though ha ha.

Logical people will say I could have saved up over five years and bought a bigger boat with all the bells and whistles - "if" I had have had the patience.  Unfortunately - or maybe fortunately - I chose with lots of naivety for sure, a different path.  I wanted a pocket cruiser not a big boat, and I wanted an old boat I could shape into my ideal of a safe pocket offshore cruiser.
In fact, I should write a book on how to ensure boat ownership leaves you broke despite earning a semi-decent wage (in NZ terms) and all that has ensued.  I could sell it on Amazon for $1.99 as sort of an antidote to all the sailboat books written by people on how to do boat ownership 'properly'...but I digress....

Sure, I am turning this boat a little pocket battleship with an unusual rig - and all that costs $money money money, plus I generally have bought the best of materials and equipment, and skimped on hardly anything because, you know, the ocean has a way of finding out boats that have been restored on the cheap, aka flimsy.

Anyway, my point is this: A lot of it depends on you.  If you have the type of personality that can do nothing but save save save for 4 or 5 years, then go buy your $100 - 200K yacht (or just sell your Auckland home if you are lucky enough to have one that you own!  I don't), which needs little refurbishment or upgrades - great.  If you have a personality like mine that would go stark raving mad living like a hermit and living on porridge while you save your $$$ -  then that is great too.


It's only money, and you can't take it with you when your are under the dirt or slid into the furnace.
But Wheels is correct when he says you will never get back on a monetary level what you put into it.
But on a human psyche level you will have memories that will last a lifetime.  It is often said, but nevertheless true - don't be sitting in your rocking chair at age 90 wishing that you had "given it a go".

Here is a vid of my first refit / rebuild to give you a bit of inspiration perhaps?  Or perhaps confirm in your mind to go a different path ha ha!

 

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Btw to the OP, here is your 30 foot boat that you can live on and sail the world if you want.
Auction ends tonight.

In fact, I am tempted to bid myself at the current bid of only $5K odd!  It will probably end up selling for $10K, leaving $10K in your pocket.  The Chico 30 is a heck of a good design.  Long waterline, transom hung rudder, built by a well respected boat builder, and on this one the teak decks have been wisely removed.

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/listing/3438790843?bof=ZOpmVooi

Go for it.

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The most financially sensible boat purchase we ever made was an old Ericson 35 in California.  Paid 22k. Sailed to Mexico and spent a year cruising Baja. Spent nothing on maintenence.  If it stopped working we threw it away and did without. Sold it after 12 months for 19k. So our accommodation and travel costs for the year were 3k (us)

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7 minutes ago, Black Panther said:

The most financially sensible boat purchase we ever made was an old Ericson 35 in California.  Paid 22k. Sailed to Mexico and spent a year cruising Baja. Spent nothing on maintenence.  If it stopped working we threw it away and did without. Sold it after 12 months for 19k. So our accommodation and travel costs for the year were 3k (us)

Webb Chiles had an Ericson 35 before he upgraded to an Ericson 37 for his first circumnavigation in. the 1970's.  You didn't by his 35 by chance....

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