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We are looking to go offshore to Fiji, and one of the things on the checklist is the spare anchor, which we already have but its a horrible thing - I think the style is called fishermans anchor.

Our primary anchor is a Delta, and we have so much chain I have never had to use the warp. We have dual rollers.
I can think of a few situations where the spare would be needed, some in a hurry - some not so much. 

What are the usual scenarios where you would use the spare anchor and which of these situations would you have it in storage/dissembled vs loaded on the second roller ready to go.

Thanks

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1. When you have not correctly moused the anchor shackle and the pin has come out

2. When you have got hopeless entangled around a bommie and need to let the anchor go to allow a diver to untangle it

3. When you have had to exit an anchorage pronto and had to dump anchor and chain (preferably buoyed for later recovery) - John and Heather Lidgard had this experience on Reward

4. Kedge anchor for when you have intimate contact with the bottom or to change the yacht's heading into a swell in a rolly anchorage (the Fortress anchors are good for these uses)

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  1. As a kedge. Sometimes might be needed in a hurry - like to get off the hard stuff on a falling tide!
  2. stream anchoring in tight space - one anchor each way into flow direction, can keep boat basically where it is when flow direction changes.
  3. storm anchor - either series or parallel 
  4. If you’ve had to buoy main anchor
     
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Other anchoring ideas. 
when wind not same direction as waves, use the chain hook to attach a bridle to chain, pay out a bit more, take bridle to sheet winch, then adjust angle as required, with bridle length.

stern anchor to keep boat alignment as required.

spare chain/warp for deep anchorage 

catenary weight for towing line (chain works better though)

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All of the above, we found lots of European boats use a stern anchor, we thought so what ?

The “so what” is they don’t swing and you do, lots of the best anchorages inside islands with high mountains (places like Marquises) you get a sea breeze during the day then it reversed at night which was completely independent of the trades. Not a worry if everyone is on one anchor but a real pain if most are on two
 

Spare anchor and rode don’t need to be ready for instant deployment, the anchor, chain and rope can all be stowed separately. We saw lots of yachts with their spare anchor strapped to the stern rail and the associated gear in a locker below. They would connect it all before entering the anchorage, then stream the stern anchor out the full length of the rode, then drop bow anchor as per normal. Then take up on stern until boat’s sitting as required. ( you’d get shot if you did this in the gulf here )

We sailed home from Europe with a Delta that we didn’t like much and a smaller fortress as second, I’ve now got a 25kg Excel that I love and will take the Delta as spare now I’ve cleaned the rust off and two pot epoxy painted it so it won’t rust again, plus two boat lengths of spare chain on our next offshore. All this I’ll stow deep in the forward crew cabin (think storage shed) as a replacement for the main anchor, however I’ll also take the fortress to use as a stern anchor if required (this can also be useful if your in a narrow channel with no wind and a moderate tide, always set main anchor to strongest tide and lighter one to the lesser tidal flow.

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I like 3 anchors. Primary, stern anchor and a storm anchor. Storm anchor stowed in the bilge and takes half a day to commission.  But I've only ever used it once and a storm that big you get 2 to 3 days notice.

Stern anchor can go to the bow if required.  

Try to keep your system flexible.

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2 hours ago, Island Time said:

Other anchoring ideas. 
when wind not same direction as waves, use the chain hook to attach a bridle to chain, pay out a bit more, take bridle to sheet winch, then adjust angle as required, with bridle length.

stern anchor to keep boat alignment as required.

spare chain/warp for deep anchorage 

catenary weight for towing line (chain works better though)

two other suggestions

1. Tie/splice 10m or so of floating yellow/orange poly prob to the bitter end of the chain, provides a good marker for recovery if you ever have to let the anchor and chain go in a hurry and can't buoy it

2. Paint the shank and/or hoop (for ROCNA's) bright orange (SPADEs paint the back half of the scoop yellow), helps spotting the anchor to check its set  - more applicable for cruising in the islands

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Thanks for all the tips. It sounds like in many cases you don't need to have the thing rigged ready to drop at a moments notice. I think it might be good peace of mind in a blow as a backup if your primary let go for any reason.
Anyone got one of those collapsible ones?

 

 

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I have a stern anchor, 14kg FOB, not ready to deploy, but still shackled to 25m chain and 40 warp. Also have a fortress in the lazarette. Have been meaning to get a stern line for use in the med etc. but been struggling  for ways and space to keep it. I mean I have too much excess weight already - especially as Firefly’s a v light boat. 
 

reading this I think I’ll unshackle the FOB and use the chain and warp as my stern line - at the very least it’ll make the tackle easier to retrieve from the lazzarette if it’s in pieces.
 

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Actually all this talk of stern lines got me thinking - Motuihe (West Bay?) Its so bloody rolly, I think its because boats don't seem to sit with the waves. I wonder if a stern line there would help that.

 

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If you want to change the way your boat lies to anchor because say the wind has changed but the waves are still rolling in  from another direction, and you don't want the bother of putting down a spare anchor - an oldie showed me a good way a few years ago.

After laying out your anchor and setting it, attach a spare line to the warp/chain and let out about3/4 metres. Take the line to the stern cleat and adust it to pull the stern towards the anchor warp to the degree you want.

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Most of us would have a cleat on each stern quarter - for solemnly adjusting things - but you could use a winch.

You could also try a 'flopper stopper' but I've never found them to be much use.

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As a point of interest, Ive foundwhen anchoring in a tidal harbour , I have found having a small to medium sized sea anchor streamed over the stern when anchored in gut or hole in the tidal stream that has rocks or other nastys outside of the chanel was a one of the better things I have tried. When the tide ebbs it keeps you in the centre of the flow. when  the tide turns at full ebb I would pull it up onto the transom as the sides of the chanel will keep you in it as the flow returns until you reach full tide. Then you stream the sea anchor once again.

It is at full tide with no flow that the boat can easily leave the chanel (wind) and become grounded outside of the chanel. Depending on the shape of your keel, you will soon  lie over on your side until the next high tide rescues you. Don't ask how I know!!

  • Haha 1
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On 5/06/2022 at 9:40 PM, alibaba said:

If you want to change the way your boat lies to anchor because say the wind has changed but the waves are still rolling in  from another direction, and you don't want the bother of putting down a spare anchor - an oldie showed me a good way a few years ago.

After laying out your anchor and setting it, attach a spare line to the warp/chain and let out about3/4 metres. Take the line to the stern cleat and adust it to pull the stern towards the anchor warp to the degree you want.

Never heard of that one before but it seems like it could work well.

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I used Alibaba's method for years when I had a trailer sailer. Really easy to set up and adjust.

Works well. However it can be a pain if wind/tide etc changes at 2am and you have to get up to adjust it or remove it altogether.

And 'ditto' on the flopper stoppers - I could never get them to work really well plus they took up a lot of space on the trailer sailer. But maybe it was just my inexperience with them

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