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aardvarkash10

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Everything posted by aardvarkash10

  1. I thought that was for scurvy?
  2. I don't see the commercial interest the company might have in refusing to service your device vs selling you a new one. At the price they quote for the work there is presumably a reasonable profit margin, and they carry very low ongoing warranty risk (1 year). Presumably they have also figured out the pissed off customer cost as well. Given all the things you are assuming and considering your advice about your acceptance of risk, it looks like self servicing is the option for you. Good luck!
  3. so they can issue you a new one with the bank's new logo and a larger credit limit to keep you permanently in hock Sheesh. Capitalism 101
  4. Child car seats. Liferafts. Safety harnesses and tethers. The WOF on my car. Structural Engineer's Practising Licences. (actually, on second thoughts, perhaps they are too lax...) Medications. Food sold to consumers ready-to-eat. Driver licences. Credit Cards. Software licences. Aircraft components. Just a quick list of things that meet a broad definition of "stuff that seems to be too conservatively lifespan rated because I (me, maybe not you) don't understand it, but perhaps someone knows more than me".
  5. But the design is older. Same thing with android devices. It doesn't matter when you bought the device, the service life is from the date of software release. I have a perfectly functional Chromebook that goes out of support next month at the end of its 5 years of support. You could still buy the same item last year and no doubt many buyers are now scratching their heads and cursing. The manufacturer carries significant liability for the functionality of these safety devices. If they have criteria for determining the device life, I would expect them to stick to it. Given
  6. Their website says otherwise gme.net.au/nz/beacon-information/ Cost of $229 given for refurbishment, 1 year warranty.
  7. Thanks everyone. There is a copy up at our ski club - go figure - and I figured it would be a good birthday present for my brother who has just aquired a 34' Talent.
  8. you mean, socialise the cost of boating?
  9. Over the last 36 hours I've been watching a series of video clips about the Race to Alaska known in shorthand as R2AK. It's an insane 700 mile race up the Inland waterways from Washington state to Alaska. Contestants on stand up paddle boards FFS. A 25 foot home built open cutter crewed by people who have never sailed. All out race teams. An old guy in a racing dinghy who takes over 22 days to complete, single handed. The only rule - no motor allowed on the craft. Funny inspiring scary and crazy in about equal measure.
  10. Bet it cost him more than that for the shout at the club bar...
  11. If we are not prepared to accept mandatory education (and ergo licencing), the boating community in its many forms needs to step up and apply strong, consistent social pressure to improve on-water behaviour.
  12. The rules are clear, if you have any understanding that rules exist. I suspect many do not. I think the people who have commented on enforcement (or lack of) are definitely onto something. Its no different to road speed - we all tend to be more observant when we know there is a speed camera or a patrol nearby.
  13. Heading to the Barrier for a week 7 to 14 January 2023. Assuming we cannot anchor due invasive seaweed issues, we are looking for a mooring within easy access of Schooner Bay. Two yachts, our 10m Spencer and a Townson 34. So either two moorings or one big bugger we can raft on. Anyone with something to rent, pm me. Cheers
  14. Heading to the Barrier for a week 7 to 14 January 2023. Assuming we cannot anchor due invasive seaweed issues, we are looking for a mooring within easy access of Schooner Bay. Two yachts, our 10m Spencer and a Townson 34. So either two moorings or one big bugger we can raft on. Anyone with something to rent, pm me. Cheers
  15. You try getting people to do training without attaching it to some form of licence...
  16. graphs showing reduction of incidents over time despite increasing number of craft. We have similar increase in craft numbers (by %) but relatively flat incident line. Not conclusive enough for a scientist for sure, but a good indicator that registration and licencing helps reduce incidents.
  17. without looking too hard, this came up. https://maritimemanagement.transport.nsw.gov.au/documents/Boating_Incidents_in_NSW_Statistical Report_17_18.pdf
  18. Hell no! I was well impressed - no offence at all!
  19. doesn't work to acheive what? Where? Under what circumstances? I agree that badly drafted law and poor enforcement may lead to poor outcomes. Also, legislation and regulation is not the 100% cure - education, social pressure, the power of insurance companies to require proof, all contribute. But every year we see posts like the op - a constant stream of complaints about poor boat-handling, navigation, colregs compliance, harbour bylaw compliance. Just as there is a claim that legislating licincing and registration don't work, its obivious the status quo is not working either.
  20. Difficult to police if you don't have an income stream to fund it, a registration scheme to identify craft, and a licencing scheme to provide a set of objective minimum standards. Oddly, we apply road laws mandating registration, licencing etc even on backroads on the West Coast. Perhaps marine licencing and registration could follow this approach. We already have mandatory registration for seamaggots, its not a long reach from there to a similar scheme for all craft - possibly allowing for small, light displacement, low speed craft to be exempt.
  21. groan... Dad puns everywhere!
  22. Rights have corresponding responsiblities. In the old days of relativelyexpensive, low powered craft in relatively uncongested waters, self-regulation probably made sense. Without autohelming and all the electronics aboard that is de rigeur these days, the skipper ipso-facto had to be on lookout and know what they were doing. Nowdays, not so much. The mix of craft, electronics, operator capability, and volume of traffic on any day means we are past the time when hoping people wil do the right thing is sufficient. In a country where the rescue of failed skippers and their cre
  23. inflation. Its everywhere
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