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Tragedy in the USA


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Skipper's decision to race.

Skipper is responsible for the boat and crew.

Besides, even if they abandon the race mid race, all the boats are still on the water. Just because they stop racing doesn't make it any safer once you are caught out. it comes down to preparedness and competency then...

That is 100% correct. To suggest otherwise is simply wrong.

 

The RC is not your mother.

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Not mother? Agreed, but how about wise friend? Before tit's get tangled, if there is a severe weather warning  perhaps the RC could amend the SI's to reflect that? Yes we know weather is unpredictable

I bought my 15yo a Piedy, figured he is better off at a Piedy raftup than doing what I did in my youth!   I did sail my Starling from Taikata to Rangitoto & back some 38 years ago. Ended up in t

That is 100% correct. To suggest otherwise is simply wrong.   The RC is not your mother.

Not mother? Agreed, but how about wise friend? Before tit's get tangled, if there is a severe weather warning  perhaps the RC could amend the SI's to reflect that? Yes we know weather is unpredictable blah blah blah and the skipper is responsible blah blah blah, BUT provided the information is at hand and reliable no RC is going to send a bunch of rafts out into what those guys experienced and wash their hands of it by claiming user pays, so I would say they they were not privy to the relevant data.

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Only been caught once by a buster coming through and it could have been a whole lot worse. Luckily we saw the boats to weather of us get slammed about a minute before it hit us. We got the main down just in time and got a couple of sheets wrapped around it.

We were in a little R930 with the self tacker on so we centred it as best we could and headed up into it. Still way too much sail, but managed to keep some momentum.

I think the race fleet got through mostly unscathed, but I remember a number of fishing boats and cruisers got into some trouble as they probably didn't even see it coming until it was too late.

 

As it was some hours after the race start, I'm not sure the RC would have even known about it until about half a dozen boats started heading home with varying degrees of damage.

Even if RC did see it coming and issued a warning, which I would think they would be obliged to do, I don't think much would have changed with the damage list.

 

Our thoughts at the time were, although we had very little notice, we were 1 of only a very few that actually dropped sail. Others were still trying to race through it. We had a boat to leeward that tried reefing as it hit and ended up with only a few threads of sail left. Luckily they still had a rig. 1 or 2 others didn't.

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Enjoy it being skippers decision to sail while it lasts because I don't think it will be for long.

Not all skippers are equal and some don't know what they don't know.

Not all boats are equal either (pretty obvious)

When the weather is bad on the Desert Road do they let the drivers decide?

Nope they shut the road, partly to keep you alive and partly so they don't spend all night dragging the muppets out of the snow.

The whole liability thing will force the issue sooner rather than later.

Even if the skipper signs "yep my risk" that may not absolve the club of liability if one of his family trust's beneficiaries decides to sue in the event of a fatality.

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OK, so in our weather (I have no clue about the busters) those storms can form very quickly. They "pop up" (in the jargon), and even with the best radar you might have only 30 minutes warning before they hit. 

 

But 30 minutes is still WAY better than the good old days. 

 

Good seamanship dictates that in all the cases cited above, boats should have had sails (tied firmly) down. 

 

How about your RC's? How do they handle it? 

 

At our place, if the RC hears thunder within two minutes of the start of the race, they abandon. (I'll have to ask them what they will do in case of a "pop up" that develops after the race starts. They are even more cautious when it is a youth race - as well they should be.) 

 

Sail safe. 

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Enjoy it being skippers decision to sail while it lasts because I don't think it will be for long.

While I do know what you mean I don't see that happening anytime soon. What bureaucracy would be willing to take on that risk, none I could think of. It will serve their primary aim in life i.e arse saving, way better to leave it to the skippers so they can be hung out to dry instead.

 

I do see a raft of more than likely costly, hard to enforce, easy to misinterpreted bullshit rules being written by someone who probably gets sea sick when faced with a cup of tea.

 

We get sudden changes in Akl like other places but not as many. More than once I've looked back to see the black wall of doom popping kites as it raced towards us. That's what can happen in the H Gulf.

 

If you don't race in the whether the area can get then you are only dumbing down the crews along with making the boats unprepared. That can only lead to bad things happening.

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On the Desert Rd analogy, wanting the RC to take responsibility for your safety is like stepping in front of a truck crossing the road, getting killed, then complaining to Auckland Transport for not keeping you safe.

It's all about personal responsibility.

It would appear that personal responsibility is going much the same way as common sense, I.e. Not so common anymore...

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All I can say is if you see something like this coming towards you get the sails down pronto. The yacht video at the beginning of this thread shows a yacht that had the sense to have their sails down early (but not so sensible with regard to life jackets and wet weather gear). Early on you can see a yacht under sail and well healed over, wonder how they faired after they were lost from view?

 

So stuff the race, safety of you and the crew becomes paramount.

 

I remember watching that Wellington race from across the bay and thinking why dont they get their sails down? Perhaps the boats around the one filming were behind the hill and didn't have a clear view of the approaching front, but the leaders would have seen it some minutes earlier, and they sailed into it.

I was especially interested as just a couple of months before I had been flattened, swamped and rescued in a southerly squall and had resolved to keep a better lookout and to get sail down if I saw such a squall coming at me again.

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Sometimes those squalls can sneak up on you at night, in which case you are well and truly . . 

 

And respectfully, those who go on about skipper's decision and personal responsibility don't 

seem to want to deal with the issue of RC responsibility for children and youth out on the 

race course . . 

 

Are we being nannies when we run youth races? Damn right we are !!

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