Jump to content

YNZ Race Regulations Cat1-Cat5; Anomalies and concerns


Recommended Posts

Below is the start of the SSANZ safety plan

I won’t bore you with the whole doc.

By the way I was taking the piss with F. Was thinking Fonterra but that’s maybe a bridge too far, my point was people get to the point the believe their own BS and think they can’t fail

 

 

 

 

SSANZ Triple Series 2019 – Safety Plan

This safety plan has been written to assist with managing competitor, volunteer, and third party safety during the SSANZ Triple Series races.

 

The Race Officer, and the members of the Race Committee are the people responsible for executing this plan.

 

This plan will be published on the event notice board, and its general tenor will be explained to competitors at the event briefing.

 

 

In scope:

- Long Haul, Short Haul, Multihull, and Small Boat divisions competing in SSANZ Triple Series races

- On-the water competitor safety

- Safety of the general public interacting with competitors or volunteers on the water

 

 

 

 

Out-of-Scope:

- All other yacht racing (separate safety plans)

- On-shore safety of competitors, volunteers and the public, other than those performing a race management function

- Safety of competitors while rigging and de-rigging yachts

- Safety of competitors while delivering yachts to or from local marina’s on race day

- Safety of competitors while delivering yachts to or from Auckland to compete in any race in the SSANZ Triple Series.

This plan recognises the difference between (a) safety and (B) compliance with safety regulations. A person who complies with safety regulations may not be safe, while a person who does not comply with safety regulations may be safe. This plan will compensate where the safety regulations do not adequately address a safety issue.

 

Reference Documents:

-

- Notice of race

- Sailing instructions

- Appendix 1 – Risk analysis and treatment

- Appendix 2 – Safety equipment

- Appendix 3 – Safety inspections

- Appendix 4 – CAT 4 Monohull Safety inspection worksheet

- Appendix 5 – Multihull Safety inspection worksheet

- Appendix 6 – Mitigation tasks

- Appendix 7 – Briefing notes

- Appendix 8 – Failed communications plan

- Appendix 9 – Crisis Management Plan

 

-

Abbreviations:

 

RCCNZ – Rescue Co-Ordination Centre NZ​​RO – Race Officer​​RC – Race Committee

APPENDIX 1 – RISK ANALYSIS AND TREATMENT

 

 

Severity of Harm

 

1 – Little or No Harm

 

2 – Some Harm

 

3 – Moderate Harm

 

4 – Significant Harm

 

5 – Extensive Harm

 

Likelihood of Harm

 

A – Very Unlikely

 

B – Possible

 

C – Even chance

 

D – Likely

 

E – Almost certain

Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way I was taking the piss with F. Was thinking Fonterra but that’s maybe a bridge too far, my point was people get to the point the believe their own BS and think they can’t fail

 

That is a salient and very valid point.

 

And this bit in the safety plan is gold

This plan recognises the difference between (a) safety and (b compliance with safety regulations. A person who complies with safety regulations may not be safe, while a person who does not comply with safety regulations may be safe. This plan will compensate where the safety regulations do not adequately address a safety issue.

This line above, the bit that people may comply with all the regulations but not be safe, is why I believe a refreshed appraoch is needed to the cat regulations.

 

What I was expecting from the SSANZ safety plan (and not having cheated and gone had a look on the SSANZ website, where I've seen it located before) is that you are using a risk based model, the cornerstone of which is risk (severity) and likelihood. That gives the platform for managing everything else through the process. This is a good example of the type of approach I believe the YNZ processes would benefit from.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That reminds me we haven’t included this on our new website.

 

Just because we have a plan doesn’t mean we run safer races, in someways it allows us to run closer to the edge

However if or when sh*t happens, because it will, we have a document that states we will do a,b,c then d

The other thing we do is document decision making, just a pad on the committee boat (something I need to get better at) this was done for the last race

 

0700 hrs forecast has remain the same strength over night and is likely to last longer, decision made to drop Gannet Rk from the following divisions Pied Piper, Baltic 1 and 2

And drop Cow Is and Black Rks from Doyle’s and PIC divisions

 

0730 NTC posted on website as per decision above.etc.....

 

I do the same type of thing as skipper offshore

Pad on chart table, first thing before departure I put down a safe water waypoint, so if we had to go to a handheld gps then we have a position that we know we can head for, that will be within sight of destination but in plenty of water, often 10+nm off

Many times I won’t add anything else but something I’ll record our position at noon and distance covered over last 24hrs.

But generally even though we have two chartplotters running everyone onboard uses my iPad with a route showing all details that are required, USB socket in cockpit table is very useful

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A word of caution around qualitative risk scoring systems, like the probability consequence model above.

 

Watch for the high consequence/low probability events as under some scoring systems they are not given much weight due to the low probability. If it does happen, its a catastrophe so its worth giving them due regard.

 

I might be telling people here to suck eggs, apologies if I am but it bears repeating. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point Ed, especially in your line of work and in our more extended event. But it can happen sailing to the start so complacencies or dangerous

“Safety is no accident”

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/04/2020 at 8:06 PM, Deep Purple said:

Theres a catch to  those ,must be stopped and smooth water.Tried one out ,thought for the price cant go wrong.might be ok in a kayak.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I  was looking for boat I had my eye on a few in Oz ,  all quick T yachts .   Two of them had fishfinder/chartplotters for plotting and GPS speed .

Way cheaper than a yachting specific plotter and they readily fit onto a swivelling arm bracket .

Our backup GPS for Cat3 is a Bad-elf pro but we leave it on full time and Bluetooth our phones to it . Makes plotting apps work faster (Cmaps and Navionics) especially in weak cell areas .

you are right about unnecessary costs and rubbish you end up with a boat full of plastic crap that mostly gets left at home for club racing . 
 

you will quickly find out your new boat is not phone friendly ! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've put together this. The italics are my thoughts

 

 

 

Cat 4/5 Racing

A summary of the equipment rules

 

11.0 – Cockpits and Companionways

11.1

Companionway blocking arrangements shall be secure and operable from inside and out – Recommendation only

11.2

Companionway needs to be blocked off to level of deck. No instruction as to what “blocked off means” Words such as solid or waterproof are not mentioned but…..

11.3

All cockpits below main deck level must be “essentially watertight that is, all openings to the hull below main deck level must be capable of being strongly and rigidly secured. 

 

You need a solid, firm fitting washboard to deck level but not the rest of the companionway but see 13.09

 

13.0 – Flooding Prevention, Hatches, Windows, Bilge Pumps

13.01

The hull….. shall form an essentially water-tight unit and any openings shall be capable of being immediately secured to maintain this integrity

13.09

Companionway doors……. Must be able to be made strong and watertight. Rebates for slides must be particularly strong

 

This seems at odds with 11.1 and why are companionways mentioned here when there is a separate section on companionways and  blocking where it is a recommendation only.

 

13.14

One manual bilge pump

13.19

Two buckets

 

No issue there. From experience a scared man with a bucket can move water faster than any bilge pump if the boat interior lends itself to it.

 

15.0 – Masts, Spars, Rigging and Sails

15.11

Tools including hacksaw, hammer and drift

 

No issue there. Again, from experience. 

 

15.19

Sail repair kit. 

 

A  decent stash of sticky-back in a water-proof container should be enough surely.

 

16.0 – Accomodation

16.03

Toilet or fitted bucket

 

One of the buckets in 13.9 with a lid should do

 

16.04

Bunks

16.05 (M)

2 permanently installed bunks recommendation only

 

Reading that, 16.04 seems to override 16.05

 

16.13

Securely installed water tank

 

What is the point of this if you don’t have a galley. How do you get the water out?

 

17.0 – Safety Systems

17.02

2 fire extinguishers, total 4kg

 

I think overkill on a boat without cooking facilities but I can live with it.

 

17.13

Lifebuoy, drogue whistle and light

17.14

Heaving Line

17.15

Knife

17.29

Anchor and warp

17.33 (K) and 17.34 (M)

Grab bags – Recommended for keelboats only, compulsory for multihulls

17.35

First Aid Kit

 

No issue with any of these

 

17.17

Lifelines sizing – Recommendation only

17.25

Pulpits, bow and stern – Recommendation only

17.27

Toe-rails are compulsory or an extra lifeline

17.23 (K)

Jackstays on keelboats recommended only

17.28 (a) (M)

Jackstays on multihulls compulsory at Cat4

 

There is no clause that says you have to have lifelines or not but 17.17 suggests you don’t. There are a number of rules if you do have them. 17.25 under Pulpits, branches off into talking about lifelines again

 

18.0 – Communications

18.2 (ii) (K) and 18.2 (iii) (M)

Handheld VHF

 

No issue with this

 

18.3

Radio receiver capable of receiving weather bulletins

18.4

Category 5 must carry a handheld VHF OR a cellphone

 

I used to carry a little transistor but one day the inspector told me the VHF qualifies for that. This would only seem to be necessary under Cat5 without a VHF

 

18.6

EPIRB or PLB recommendation only

 

I think these should be compulsory in Cat4 overnight races

 

18.7

Flares under 3 years old but some under 5 can be carried in addition

 

I would prefer to see each type of flare have 50/50 mix between 3 and 5 years old if a PLB carried

 

19.0 – Navigation

19.01

Installed Compass

19.03 (b) (c) (f)

Charts, plotting equipment and manuals

 

No issue with any of these

 

19.03 (a)

Tide tables

Available on VHF and cellphone in most areas

 

19.04 (d)

Echo (Depth) Sounder - compulsory

19.04 (e)

GPS or Log – recommended only

 

 

A GPS is much more use than a depth sounder. No requirement for the depth sounder to be permanently installed

 

19.07 and 19.08

Navigation lights permanently mounted and wired

 

Permanently mounted must be for the duration of the race. Wired can only mean you don’t have to run cables and clips to use them for example wired could mean internally wired to removable batteries. There is no requirement for them to be fed by a 12v system, you could run wires to 3 cell battery pack. In my experience fixed nav lights are fraught with unreliability and modern removable options are much more reliable and give options for maintain the integrity of the system. Personally, I don’t like masthead lights at all. When sailing you are looking at the waves and horizon, not up in the air, and approaching the city masthead lights get lost in the clutter.

 

19.09

Fog Horn

 

I really can’t see why this is needed and question if they have ever been used

 

20.0 – Engineering

 

20.01

An engine - Recommended only

20.05

If you do have an engine it is recommended that it can push the boat at the square root of the waterline length in feet

 

Several other clauses effect if you have an engine and all are reasonable

 

20.13

Outboard fuel tanks and operating

 

There is no requirement for an outboard to have a separate fuel tank. Inbuilt tanks are fine, however topping them up must be able to be done safely without leaning way over the back. The outboard can likewise be removed if safe to do so.

 

20.14 and 20.16

Sea cocks and plugs

19.03 (b) (c) (f)

Charts, plotting equipment and manuals

 

No issue with any of these

 

22.0 Sail Numbers and Name

 

22.1

Sail numbers and name on the hull

22.4

Identification on equipment

 

No issues but note the name and sail number can be anywhere on the hull which can be the stern

 

TRAILER YACHT

Many events include keelboats, multihulls and trailer yachts in the same fleet. These are the variations to the keelboat/multihull rules which shows the people writing them don’t talk to each other much. Some of these are quite significant

 

7.09

Washboards or effective waterproof covers are permissible for companionways

7.09

Fittings bow and stern suitable for towing are required

9.01

Yachts shall carry a fixed or portable ladder for getting from the water

9.03

The yachts name and number shall be on the side only

9.05

You must carry a boathook

9.06

You must carry a towline twice the boats length

10.3

Navigation lights shall be fitted to and operational on all yachts sailing after sunset

Nothing about permanent or wired

11.4

Only one fire extinguisher needs to be carried

12.4 (a)

Large orange flag required for waving

12.4 (f)

No flares older than 3 years are acceptable

13.1 and 13.2

An engine must be carried in an operation position and must be at least a quarter HP per foot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

22.0 SAIL NUMBERS AND NAME
22.1 Yachts shall clearly display in legible characters at least 50mm but preferably 100mm in size, their registered name on the hull and YNZ sail number on the mainsail at least.
 

This was pointed out to me doing boat checks for the RNI as per the 2017/2020 Safety regs 

Name must be on hull, sail numbers on mainsail only, the guy that pointed it out also said we had sail numbers on hull in the NoR so he added to hull (lucky he owns a printing company)

So if not stated in NoR then not required on hull

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Jon said:

22.0 SAIL NUMBERS AND NAME
22.1 Yachts shall clearly display in legible characters at least 50mm but preferably 100mm in size, their registered name on the hull and YNZ sail number on the mainsail at least.
 

This was pointed out to me doing boat checks for the RNI as per the 2017/2020 Safety regs 

Name must be on hull, sail numbers on mainsail only, the guy that pointed it out also said we had sail numbers on hull in the NoR so he added to hull (lucky he owns a printing company)

So if not stated in NoR then not required on hull

Oops, true, good spotting. Trailer yacht however must have the number on the hull sides (9:03)

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, splat said:

most regional council Navigation bylaws require registered number on hull also not sure if being a member of a "recognised body" eg. YNZ  exempts this requirement

I thinks thats more to take up the jetski types that infest the place over summer.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, splat said:

Maybe up north... north is not everywhere

 

1 hour ago, Vorpal Blade said:

I thinks thats more to take up the jetski types that infest the place over summer.

 

Think splat is referring to your boat reg number as displayed on your sails . It’s also meant to be on your hull 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...