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out of respect for the sailor and his family Matt, I'd like to see this thread cease. There is no room for speculative comments, no questions to be answered, and while there is plenty to discuss this isn't the place or the time.

 

Its just bloody sad.

 

 

RIP John Fisher

 

Do you want every other thread on every website on the Internet to cease as well?

We haven't even started commenting on what happened, which I thought was very respectful. Check out the leading global sailing website, sailing anarchy, if you want to see disrespectful.

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out of respect for the sailor and his family Matt, I'd like to see this thread cease. There is no room for speculative comments, no questions to be answered, and while there is plenty to discuss this isn't the place or the time.

I'm not sure about that. This story will fade fast, they always do, and the opportunity to learn with it.

 

There is no out of the ordinary speculation but the thread will be a good kick in the slats for the rest of us who can be a bit sloppy with safety stuff. If discussing this incident and just one person learns something that then saves their life I'd think John and his family would be pleased, if it was me I sure would be.

 

Personally my biggest fear of all fears, even larger than needles, is going overboard and watching the boat sail away. When Nick and Steve got taken out on Platino, I did find myself in the very unusual position of not sleeping for a few days due to thought of what Steve went thru. This incident and thread is yet another reminder, and a huge kick hard in the knuts level, for me not to be as slack as I know I often am.

 

The chances are exceptionally high next time I'm out there and hesitating for whatever reason whether I clip on or 'just pop up there for a quick sec' both Steve and John will pop in to remind me to clip on and not to be a dickhead. I can see myself thanking them both for that.

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I'm not sure about that. This story will fade fast, they always do, and the opportunity to learn with it.

 

There is no out of the ordinary speculation but the thread will be a good kick in the slats for the rest of us who can be a bit sloppy with safety stuff. If discussing this incident and just one person learns something that then saves their life I'd think John and his family would be pleased, if it was me I sure would be.

 

Personally my biggest fear of all fears, even larger than needles, is going overboard and watching the boat sail away. When Nick and Steve got taken out on Platino, I did find myself in the very unusual position of not sleeping for a few days due to thought of what Steve went thru. This incident and thread is yet another reminder, and a huge kick hard in the knuts level, for me not to be as slack as I know I often am.

 

The chances are exceptionally high next time I'm out there and hesitating for whatever reason whether I clip on or 'just pop up there for a quick sec' both Steve and John will pop in to remind me to clip on and not to be a dickhead. I can see myself thanking them both for that.

 

Well said !! If there is ANY positive to be taken out of this its this.

 

1st rule - Don't go overboard ...Ever !!

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Today the media is saying he was not clipped on. Most of us don't clip on occasionally when we should. This is a very poignant reminder to us all, as KM said. 

The report I heard was knocked off the boat by the boom, not clipped on, possibly/probably unconscious in the water. That would explain no PLB activation. A very sad event.  

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I cruise solo or short handed so can’t usually rely on anyone rescuing me, and realise the risk of going over due to human nature, gear failure or whatever reason is real . This sad loss encourages me to reinstate my last chance line, a long floating line with a float and loop on the end, that can be rigged to disconnect the autopilot or Windvane and even release the sheets or round the boat up when weight comes on it. I am not racing or normally sailing particularly fast so although It may not save me if I should go over for any reason and still be conscious at least I would have a chance.

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KM is spot on - it so easy to get complacent.

But don't get in a car if you are really worried about risk.

Off topic I know but the drone footage has been amazing.

Can anyone tell me the purpose of the jockey poles - they are a long way aft ?

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Hi hearing how it happened ,trying to get forward to help the ship , very sad. , we have all done it in our waters and weather , it’s a risk and I will venture forward tomorrow a few times alone wide eyed keeping an eye on the boom to do something ,

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proper oceanic survival suits 

 

are too bulky to work in

 

they are designed to be be put on only when the 'ship' 

 

is sinking or the oil rig burning

 

services-Immersion-suit2-24-900x630.jpg

 

a daily 'work' suit that can be immersed is quite different

 

31706_222-2-main_1.png

 

but unfortunately uses the same name

 

though undoubtedly different standards

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We have both of those onboard, a true survival suit is very difficult to move in and near impossible to sail a yacht whilst wearing one.

Drysuits are fantastic for sailing in, warm and dry but would eventually get wet if you were immersed for any length of time as they are simply multiple layers of Goretex with seals at the cuffs and neck. Great for winter racing.

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I did wonder why the AIS could not be found. They had Auto AIS SARTs on their lifejackets. Turns out the AIS transponder on the boat could not receive - broken antenna. An interesting article on the NY times...

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/18/sports/volvo-ocean-race.html?rref=collection%2Fissuecollection%2Ftodays-new-york-times&action=click&contentCollection=todayspaper&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=8&pgtype=collection

Sad story...

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“If we had our A.I.S., we would have found him,” Witt said. “I’ve learned that redundancies in this system is an example of change, like a second antenna.”

 

Sad indeed.

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