Jump to content


Photo

Lost for months in the mid-Pacific


  • Please log in to reply
72 replies to this topic

#21 Knot Me... maybe

Knot Me... maybe

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,512 posts

Posted 29 October 2017 - 08:35 AM

Saw them on telly and they did look remarkably well and very much not weather beaten considering the time frames being talked. Also didn't the boats bum look very clean.

 

It's bizarre enough it could be legit and probably is. Maybe they just didn't spend much time above deck.


  • 0

#22 wheels

wheels

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,516 posts

Posted 29 October 2017 - 10:06 AM

Bizzare it most certainly is. It's a honey pot for conspiracy thoughts.
I watched the interview and thought blimey, they are making weird claims. Like thinking they would only survive another 24hrs, yet they had been at sea ruffly 5months. You would think that after 5 months, several severe storms etc, they would have had many previous similar thoughts and then woke the next morning to find themselves alive and well.
I can't see anything wrong with the Rig.
I am surprised they thought they would take a month or more to get to Tahiti.
They had supposedly, already made it to several Pacific Islands.
They can't have had any flares on board. They had seen boats, but obviously no way of contacting them. Except I would expect for most of us, we would have tried something. A piece of broken mirror to reflect. Burn some diesel and anything plastic to make smoke. There is always a way to do something that looks out of the norm. And far out at sea like that, it is pretty sure that if they see a boat, that boat see's them.


  • 0

#23 Dr Dave

Dr Dave

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts
  • LocationThe Hamptons

Posted 29 October 2017 - 10:25 AM

Barking


  • 0
Dr Dave

" I spent a lot of money on birds, booze and fast cars. The rest I just squandered "
George Best

#24 RWC

RWC

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts

Posted 29 October 2017 - 08:23 PM

Raz, interesting point about the growth. Does look as though they have been listing/lying for a while.

Would be keen to know what antifoul they use though, looks like a damn good promo for someone for 5 months worth of drifting.


  • 0

#25 Romany

Romany

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 449 posts

Posted 29 October 2017 - 10:11 PM

I'm with Dr Dave on this. Reckon its complete bollocks. Why any worthy media house would waste the time it takes t write such a load of crap is beyond me.


  • 0

#26 John B

John B

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,510 posts
  • LocationAkl

Posted 30 October 2017 - 01:59 AM

I live in Kiribati for a while, you can get ships into the lagoon. In fact the Americans killed a shitload of themselves because they did just that, against the recommendations of 2 kiwis and a Aussie who knew the place very well.

That was the Battle of Tarawa.... which mostly took place on Betio and Bairiki, 2 of the lumps that stick up above sea level on the SW corner of Tawara, which is quite large. Most lumps are joined by causeways now.

There was a Japanese airfield on the Island they didn't want to leave behind them as they moved back westward across the pacific so they wanted the Japanese gone.

The Americans came into the lagoon to get behind some big guns aimed East but couldn't be turned around. The NZ and Aussies said best not too as it is shallow close to land, a bit like Cheltenham beach where the tide goes out 200mts. There it doesn't fully dry but drops to knee-waist deep. The Americans knew better so after 4 days of bombing the crap out of the tiny bit of sand, it's no bigger than Motuihe, by aircraft during the day and navy during the night. The Americans then jumped in the boats to go ashore thinking they would meet bugger all. But the Japanese had fortified their placed with coconut palms and layers of sand so were hardly touched.

The Americans got about 100mts from dry land and ran aground. They all jump out to wade ashore. The Japanese came out from their bunkers and mowed them down in their 1000's. Took 3-4 days to clear the island, as tiny as it was. 27,000 people died for a tiny tiny piece of sand in the middle of no where.

We dug 3 Japanese soldiers up when doing the footings. One was still in full uniform complete with gun, ammo, canteen and all his gear. Lost count of how much munitions were also found, much just lying on the ground.

They have a excellent archive on Bairiki with footage and photos. With many of the structures still there it was very easy to stand and see exactly where the bodies washed against the beach 20 deep in the waves, very sobering to think humans can do that to each other. My 'house' was 25mts odd from the still existing Japanese HQ bunker. Not a bad size very thick walled concrete structure.... with many holes in it.

But I digress... carry on.

I think it'll be Christmas island they couldn't get into. A cyclone changed the depth there a few years ago and its a roadstead anchorage now.
  • 0

#27 erice

erice

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,624 posts

Posted 30 October 2017 - 07:39 AM

they seem to have relied on their vhf for ship - shore communications once their phone-sat?- got washed overboard by wave

 

but surely if they had been loitering around a major island lagoon trying to enter there would have been other boats listening in or people on shore?

 

wonder when they started their daily emergency broadcasts?


  • 0

if posts offend .. or even too hard

 

please "ignore" :thumbup:

 

http://crew.org.nz/f...ea=ignoredusers


#28 ex TL systems

ex TL systems

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 782 posts

Posted 30 October 2017 - 07:52 AM

On YouTube a channel called slow boat sailing has there conference call to media on it,seems they were lucky to survive the attacking 40 to 50 ft tiger sharks etc which went on to destroy someone else's boat because they saw the wreckage a few days later.
  • 0

#29 wheels

wheels

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,516 posts

Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:11 AM

 

attacking 40 to 50 ft tiger sharks etc which went on to destroy someone else's boat because they saw the wreckage a few days later.

I have heard some scary stories about how big things can grow out there. Wow. I think they are really lucky the Giant Squids did not try to eat them too. That big deep blue ocean can be a scary place...especially in the Dark. :roll:
Does anyone think that years supply of food they had on board may have gone off somewhat? ;-)


  • 0

#30 Sabre

Sabre

    Advanced Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 878 posts

Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:42 AM

On YouTube a channel called slow boat sailing has there conference call to media on it,seems they were lucky to survive the attacking 40 to 50 ft tiger sharks etc which went on to destroy someone else's boat because they saw the wreckage a few days later.

I watched that yesterday too.

Apparently the tiger sharks were teaching their young how to hunt by attacking their 50ft sailboat. They managed to survive by huddling on the floor really quietly because the sharks could hear them breathing.

It is also pretty amazing that they entered the "Devil's Triangle" an area where "if boats go in they rarely come out and if they do their is no one on them" because apparently it is a "tiger shark location" and still survived!!

I can't wait to see the movie, it's going to be a cracker!
  • 1




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users