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Installed the dodger I've been worrying about all winter. Trying to make it look old school cause its that type of yacht though may be pretty modern looking when the glass goes on cause its going on in the same style as a car wind screen. That is simply glued to the outer surface and completely covering the timber. Glazier tints the glass where the mullions are. Took a while to come up with this design!

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BBay, we've got a similar curved shape to our bimini and it looks to be a similar size though its a sunbrella covering on stainless tube. I thought it'd be an ideal place for mounting solar panels, but when I mention that to anyone they all suck air thru their teeth, scratch their chins and say "I dunno, what about the shading from the boom?". Do you think shading is going to be much of an issue for you?

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progressing! Can get 360 watts of solar panels on there.

Thats an interesting approach to a hard dodger bbay. It reminds a bit of the general style that Tad Roberts uses on his boats. He's a PNW naval architect with some terrific designs across a broad spectrum of power through to yachts. He seems to be able to keep a very traditional look within modern functional requirements, especially for the area that he's in.

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Yes I think shade is an issue Grinna. If I'm desparato for the stuff I'll just have to haul the boom across out of the way. It really suits these thin flexible panels which can be got from trademe at about 800 x 500 giving 120 watts. At a pinch I may even get 4 of these on there and they ought to look ok as well.

To be able to get cat 1 in the future I will have to use toughened glass which is simply glued with polyurethane glue, like sikaflex, and the glass has ceramic coating to shade the glue from uv light.

 

Thanks John, yes I love the look! Really growing on me and it is old school but when the glass goes around should look pretty tidy. Hope! The glass should give it a fair amount of bracing also. Its very practical in that the roof area is large as is the interior so should be a boon! Oh yes the glass being vertical won't, hope , get as dirty as a laid back style.

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To be able to get cat 1 in the future I will have to use toughened glass which is simply glued with polyurethane glue, like sikaflex, and the glass has ceramic coating to shade the glue from uv light.

 

Is that right though?( I hope not) plenty of soft dodgers get through cat 1 because the structural and watertightness of the boat is dependent on the existing hatch and bulkhead etc. Most hard dodger windows won't meet the 2 square feet threshold anyway.

I'm planning on a hard dodger myself and intend to use acrylic at this stage because its more scratch resistant than polycarbonate.I'll just beef it up, If a wave does bust through.. tough luck, all the hatch structure is still there.

 

Oh.. are you opening all that out?

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Thats what the glazier told me. May indeed be selling me upwards! No won't be changing the hatch, and the dodger is sacraficial, not through bolted just screwed and glued. Here's a view of the top, the handholds are great.

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post-11360-141887228396.jpg

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Should be ok IT, the cabin top is 40mm thick totara with ply overlay. Plain glass should do the trick then. She's mostly used for coastal cruising so I thought I could risk having some overhangs on the top. Trying for as much area up there as I can get. It is a lot like Tad Robert's beautiful designs, thanks John. Interesting to see when the glass goes on as should be pretty neat without any timber on the outer side. Easy to maintain!

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Took the dodgy seagull boat out for her maiden burn.

 

Mental note: Take more duct tape next time.

 

 

Well done :clap: Would the great vessel benefit with a cabin like fairing to reduce windage? Rob James and Ron Holland were hot on that in the early 80's with their Tri's. Also Sinclair of the failed electric car found fairings made a difference at the lower speeds.

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Not a hell of a lot of science went into this fine vessel, so we did the bare minimum to make her float and be able to carry an engine. Didn't know how she would float or if her stability would be high enough. So before getting too carried away we thought she should have a quick test. That's why she looks a bit simple!

 

So much fun burning around in such a rickety dinghy though :thumbup:

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